JERSEY CUSD 100

View At-a-Glance Report
    <div class="view view1"> <p>This graph shows the percentage of students that meet or exceed state standards on the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT). The buttons above the graph allow you to select reading, mathematics, or composite (combined) scores. Two years of results are shown for the school, Charter Management Organization (CMO), or district, along with the statewide averages for comparison.</p> <p>In 2013, ISBE raised performance expectations to improve alignment of ISAT scores with the more rigorous Common Core State Standards that are now being implemented. These higher expectations raised the “cut scores,” or the thresholds between different performance levels (such as “Below Standards” and “Meets Standards”) which resulted in a downward shift in the number of students meeting or exceeding Reading and Math standards.</p> <p>In the table on the left, the school’s test results in 2012 and 2013 are shown using the new cut scores to provide an accurate comparison. In the table on the right, 2012 performance is shown based on the original or old cut scores.</p> <p>Click on “View Details” to see additional years of ISAT performance data, grade-level and subject-area results, and performance of student sub-groups.</p> </div> <div class="view view2"> <p>This display allows you to take a closer look at ISAT performance for this school.</p> <p>Grade: The drop-down menu allows you to select a Summary (all grades at this school averaged together) or Each Grade at this school. Note that the ISAT is administered in grades 3-8. Click “Go” to see your selection.</p> <p>Subject: The drop-down menu gives access to All Subjects or to one at a time. Click “Go” to see your selection.</p> <p>Comparisons: For any combination of the above menu selections, you can click “Add District Comparison” and/or “Add State Comparison” to see side-by-side results.</p> <p>Once you have made your selections, you can press the "Go!" button to display information. The "Excel" button downloads this information as an Excel file.</p> <p>Compare Old vs. New Cut Scores: This button opens an advanced screen that shows multiple years of ISAT performance according to either the old or the new cut scores.</p> </div> <div class="view view3"> <p>This advanced display illustrates year-by-year performance on the ISAT under a common set of cut scores, allowing for a more accurate year-by-year comparison and a view of the shift in results due to the change in cut scores.</p> <p>In 2013, ISBE raised performance expectations on ISAT Reading and Mathematics. These higher expectations raised the “cut scores,” or the thresholds between different performance levels (such as “Below Standards” and “Meets Standards”) which resulted in a downward shift in the ranking of students in meeting or exceeding the new, more rigorous Reading and Math standards. </p> <p>The Old and New Cut Score buttons illustrate the shift in this school. Use the Grade, Subject, and Student Group options across the top of the screen to customize your view. (Note that this display only shows Reading and Mathematics as the Science cut scores have not changed.)</p> </div> <p>A school demonstrating high state test results is likely to have multiple systems that support high levels of academic achievement. These may include a high level of teacher quality, advanced courses, and rigorous academic standards. Standardized tests results should be interpreted in the context of other measures of student achievement. </p> <ul> <li><p>Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT)</p></li> </ul> <p>In January 2013, Illinois raised ISAT reading and math benchmarks. This means that since meeting or exceeding standards on the ISAT is harder this year, the percentage of students who score as meeting or exceeding standards has decreased. This does not reflect a decrease in the quality of schools, teachers, or student work - it reflects higher standards. Starting in 2014-2015, Illinois will replace the ISAT with a new test that is fully aligned to the Common Core State Standards, an effort with participation from more than 40 states to unify and raise standards.</p> <p>For more information go to <a href="http://www.isbe.state.il.us/assessment/isat.htm" target="_blank">Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT)</a></p> <ul> <li><p><a href="http://commoncoreil.org/wp-content/uploads/2013/08/K-8-CC-ISAT-Parent-letter-color-8-28-13.pdf" target="_blank">Common Core/ISAT Parent Letter</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://www.isbe.net/assessment/htmls/isat-cut-scores13.htm" target="_blank">Student Assessment (ISBE)</a></p></li> </ul> <div class="view view1"> <p>This graph shows the percentage of students that meet or exceed state standards on the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT). The buttons above the graph allow you to select reading, mathematics, or composite (combined) scores. Two years of results are shown for the school or district, along with the statewide averages for comparison.</p> <p>In 2013, ISBE raised performance expectations to improve alignment of ISAT scores with the more rigorous Common Core State Standards that are now being implemented. These higher expectations raised the “cut scores,” or the thresholds between different performance levels (such as “Below Standards” and “Meets Standards”) which resulted in a downward shift in the number of students meeting or exceeding Reading and Math standards.</p> <p>In the table on the left, the school’s test results in 2012 and 2013 are shown using the new cut scores to provide an accurate comparison. In the table on the right, 2012 performance is shown based on the original or old cut scores.</p> <p>Click on “View Details” to see additional years of ISAT performance data, grade-level and subject-area results, and performance of student sub-groups.</p> </div> <div class="view view2"> <p>This display allows you to take a closer look at ISAT performance for this school.</p> <p>Grade: The drop-down menu allows you to select a Summary (all grades at this school averaged together) or Each Grade at this school. Note that the ISAT is administered in grades 3-8. Click “Go” to see your selection.</p> <p>Subject: The drop-down menu gives access to All Subjects or to one at a time. Click “Go” to see your selection.</p> <p>Comparisons: For any combination of the above menu selections, you can click “Add District Comparison” and/or “Add State Comparison” to see side-by-side results.</p> <p>Once you have made your selections, you can press the "Go!" button to display information. The "Excel" button downloads this information as an Excel file.</p> <p>Compare Old vs. New Cut Scores: This button opens an advanced screen that shows multiple years of ISAT performance according to either the old or the new cut scores.</p> </div> <div class="view view3"> <p>This advanced display illustrates year-by-year performance on the ISAT under a common set of cut scores, allowing for a more accurate year-by-year comparison and a view of the shift in results due to the change in cut scores.</p> <p>In 2013, ISBE raised performance expectations on ISAT Reading and Mathematics. These higher expectations raised the “cut scores,” or the thresholds between different performance levels (such as “Below Standards” and “Meets Standards”) which resulted in a downward shift in the ranking of students in meeting or exceeding the new, more rigorous Reading and Math standards. </p> <p>The Old and New Cut Score buttons illustrate the shift in this school. Use the Grade, Subject, and Student Group options across the top of the screen to customize your view. (Note that this display only shows Reading and Mathematics as the Science cut scores have not changed.)</p> </div> <p>A school demonstrating high state test results is likely to have multiple systems that support high levels of academic achievement. These may include a high level of teacher quality, advanced courses, and rigorous academic standards. Standardized tests results should be interpreted in the context of other measures of student achievement. </p> <ul> <li><p>Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT)</p></li> </ul> <p>In January 2013, Illinois raised ISAT reading and math benchmarks. This means that since meeting or exceeding standards on the ISAT is harder this year, the percentage of students who score as meeting or exceeding standards has decreased. This does not reflect a decrease in the quality of schools, teachers, or student work - it reflects higher standards. Starting in 2014-2015, Illinois will replace the ISAT with a new test that is fully aligned to the Common Core State Standards, an effort with participation from more than 40 states to unify and raise standards.</p> <p>For more information go to <a href="http://www.isbe.state.il.us/assessment/isat.htm" target="_blank">Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT)</a></p> <ul> <li><p><a href="http://commoncoreil.org/wp-content/uploads/2013/08/K-8-CC-ISAT-Parent-letter-color-8-28-13.pdf" target="_blank">Common Core/ISAT Parent Letter</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://www.isbe.net/assessment/htmls/isat-cut-scores13.htm" target="_blank">Student Assessment (ISBE)</a></p></li> </ul> <div class="view view1"> <p>This graph shows the percentage of students that meet or exceed state standards on the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT). The buttons above the graph allow you to select reading, mathematics, or composite (combined) scores. Two years of results are shown for the school or district, along with the statewide averages for comparison.</p> <p>In 2013, ISBE raised performance expectations to improve alignment of ISAT scores with the more rigorous Common Core State Standards that are now being implemented. These higher expectations raised the “cut scores,” or the thresholds between different performance levels (such as “Below Standards” and “Meets Standards”) which resulted in a downward shift in the number of students meeting or exceeding Reading and Math standards.</p> <p>In the table on the left, the school’s test results in 2012 and 2013 are shown using the new cut scores to provide an accurate comparison. In the table on the right, 2012 performance is shown based on the original or old cut scores.</p> <p>Click on “View Details” to see additional years of ISAT performance data, grade-level and subject-area results, and performance of student sub-groups.</p> </div> <div class="view view2"> <p>This display allows you to take a closer look at ISAT performance for this school.</p> <p>Grade: The drop-down menu allows you to select a Summary (all grades at this school averaged together) or Each Grade at this school. Note that the ISAT is administered in grades 3-8. Click “Go” to see your selection.</p> <p>Subject: The drop-down menu gives access to All Subjects or to one at a time. Click “Go” to see your selection.</p> <p>Comparisons: For any combination of the above menu selections, you can click “Add District Comparison” and/or “Add State Comparison” to see side-by-side results.</p> <p>Once you have made your selections, you can press the "Go!" button to display information. The "Excel" button downloads this information as an Excel file.</p> <p>Compare Old vs. New Cut Scores: This button opens an advanced screen that shows multiple years of ISAT performance according to either the old or the new cut scores.</p> </div> <div class="view view3"> <p>This advanced display illustrates year-by-year performance on the ISAT under a common set of cut scores, allowing for a more accurate year-by-year comparison and a view of the shift in results due to the change in cut scores.</p> <p>In 2013, ISBE raised performance expectations on ISAT Reading and Mathematics. These higher expectations raised the “cut scores,” or the thresholds between different performance levels (such as “Below Standards” and “Meets Standards”) which resulted in a downward shift in the ranking of students in meeting or exceeding the new, more rigorous Reading and Math standards. </p> <p>The Old and New Cut Score buttons illustrate the shift in this school. Use the Grade, Subject, and Student Group options across the top of the screen to customize your view. (Note that this display only shows Reading and Mathematics as the Science cut scores have not changed.)</p> </div> <p>A school demonstrating high state test results is likely to have multiple systems that support high levels of academic achievement. These may include a high level of teacher quality, advanced courses, and rigorous academic standards. Standardized tests results should be interpreted in the context of other measures of student achievement. </p> <ul> <li><p>Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT)</p></li> </ul> <p>In January 2013, Illinois raised ISAT reading and math benchmarks. This means that since meeting or exceeding standards on the ISAT is harder this year, the percentage of students who score as meeting or exceeding standards has decreased. This does not reflect a decrease in the quality of schools, teachers, or student work - it reflects higher standards. Starting in 2014-2015, Illinois will replace the ISAT with a new test that is fully aligned to the Common Core State Standards, an effort with participation from more than 40 states to unify and raise standards.</p> <p>For more information go to <a href="http://www.isbe.state.il.us/assessment/isat.htm" target="_blank">Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT)</a></p> <ul> <li><p><a href="http://commoncoreil.org/wp-content/uploads/2013/08/K-8-CC-ISAT-Parent-letter-color-8-28-13.pdf" target="_blank">Common Core/ISAT Parent Letter</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://www.isbe.net/assessment/htmls/isat-cut-scores13.htm" target="_blank">Student Assessment (ISBE)</a></p></li> </ul> <div class="view view1"> <p>This graph shows the percentage of students that meet or exceed state standards on the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT). The buttons above the graph allow you to select reading, mathematics, or composite (combined) scores. Two years of results are shown for the school or district, along with the statewide averages for comparison.</p> <p>In 2013, ISBE raised performance expectations to improve alignment of ISAT scores with the more rigorous Common Core State Standards that are now being implemented. These higher expectations raised the “cut scores,” or the thresholds between different performance levels (such as “Below Standards” and “Meets Standards”) which resulted in a downward shift in the number of students meeting or exceeding Reading and Math standards.</p> <p>In the table on the left, the district’s test results in 2012 and 2013 are shown using the new cut scores to provide an accurate comparison. In the table on the right, 2012 performance is shown based on the original or old cut scores.</p> <p>Click on “View Details” to see additional years of ISAT performance data, grade-level and subject-area results, and performance of student sub-groups.</p> </div> <div class="view view2"> <p>This display allows you to take a closer look at ISAT performance for this district.</p> <p>Grade: The drop-down menu allows you to select a Summary (all grades at this school averaged together) or Each Grade at this district. Note that the ISAT is administered in grades 3-8. Click “Go” to see your selection.</p> <p>Subject: The drop-down menu gives access to All Subjects or to one at a time. Click “Go” to see your selection.</p> <p>Comparisons: For any combination of the above menu selections, you can click “Add State Comparison” to see side-by-side results.</p> <p>Once you have made your selections, you can press the "Go!" button to display information. The "Excel" button downloads this information as an Excel file.</p> <p>Compare Old vs. New Cut Scores: This button opens an advanced screen that shows multiple years of ISAT performance according to either the old or the new cut scores.</p> </div> <div class="view view3"> <p>This advanced display illustrates year-by-year performance on the ISAT under a common set of cut scores, allowing for a more accurate year-by-year comparison and a view of the shift in results due to the change in cut scores.</p> <p>In 2013, ISBE raised performance expectations on ISAT Reading and Mathematics. These higher expectations raised the “cut scores,” or the thresholds between different performance levels (such as “Below Standards” and “Meets Standards”) which resulted in a downward shift in the ranking of students in meeting or exceeding the new, more rigorous Reading and Math standards. </p> <p>The Old and New Cut Score buttons illustrate the shift in this district. Use the Grade, Subject, and Student Group options across the top of the screen to customize your view. (Note that this display only shows Reading and Mathematics as the Science cut scores have not changed.)</p> </div> <p>A district demonstrating high state test results is likely to have multiple systems that support high levels of academic achievement. These may include a high level of teacher quality, advanced courses, and rigorous academic standards. Standardized tests results should be interpreted in the context of other measures of student achievement. </p> <ul> <li><p>Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT)</p></li> </ul> <p>In January 2013, Illinois raised ISAT reading and math benchmarks. This means that since meeting or exceeding standards on the ISAT is harder this year, the percentage of students who score as meeting or exceeding standards has decreased. This does not reflect a decrease in the quality of schools, teachers, or student work - it reflects higher standards. Starting in 2014-2015, Illinois will replace the ISAT with a new test that is fully aligned to the Common Core State Standards, an effort with participation from more than 40 states to unify and raise standards.</p> <p>For more information go to <a href="http://www.isbe.state.il.us/assessment/isat.htm" target="_blank">Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT)</a></p> <ul> <li><p><a href="http://commoncoreil.org/wp-content/uploads/2013/08/K-8-CC-ISAT-Parent-letter-color-8-28-13.pdf" target="_blank">Common Core/ISAT Parent Letter</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://www.isbe.net/assessment/htmls/isat-cut-scores13.htm" target="_blank">Student Assessment (ISBE)</a></p></li> </ul> <div class="view view1"> <p>This graph shows the percentage of students that meet or exceed state standards on the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT). The buttons above the graph allow you to select reading, mathematics, or composite (combined) scores. Two years of results are shown for the statewide averages. </p> <p>In 2013, ISBE raised performance expectations to improve alignment of ISAT scores with the more rigorous Common Core State Standards that are now being implemented. These higher expectations raised the “cut scores,” or the thresholds between different performance levels (such as “Below Standards” and “Meets Standards”) which resulted in a downward shift in the number of students meeting or exceeding Reading and Math standards.</p> <p>In the table on the left, the statewide Illinois test results in 2012 and 2013 are shown using the new cut scores to provide an accurate comparison. In the table on the right, 2012 performance is shown based on the original or old cut scores.</p> <p>Click on “View Details” to see additional years of ISAT performance data, grade-level and subject-area results, and performance of student sub-groups.</p> </div> <div class="view view2"> <p>This display allows you to take a closer look at ISAT performance in Illinois.</p> <p>Grade: The drop-down menu allows you to select a Summary (all grades in Illinois schools averaged together) or Each Grade. Note that the ISAT is administered in grades 3-8. Click “Go” to see your selection.</p> <p>Subject: The drop-down menu gives access to All Subjects or to one at a time. Click “Go” to see your selection.</p> <p>Once you have made your selections, you can press the "Go!" button to display information. The "Excel" button downloads this information as an Excel file.</p> <p>Compare Old vs. New Cut Scores: This button opens an advanced screen that shows multiple years of ISAT performance according to either the old or the new cut scores.</p> </div> <p>A school or district demonstrating high state test results is likely to have multiple systems that support high levels of academic achievement. These may include a high level of teacher quality, advanced courses, and rigorous academic standards. Standardized tests results should be interpreted in the context of other measures of student achievement. </p> <ul> <li><p>Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT)</p></li> </ul> <p>In January 2013, Illinois raised ISAT reading and math benchmarks. This means that since meeting or exceeding standards on the ISAT is harder this year, the percentage of students who score as meeting or exceeding standards has decreased. This does not reflect a decrease in the quality of schools, teachers, or student work - it reflects higher standards. Starting in 2014-2015, Illinois will replace the ISAT with a new test that is fully aligned to the Common Core State Standards, an effort with participation from more than 40 states to unify and raise standards.</p> <p>For more information go to <a href="http://www.isbe.state.il.us/assessment/isat.htm" target="_blank">Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT)</a></p> <ul> <li><p><a href="http://commoncoreil.org/wp-content/uploads/2013/08/K-8-CC-ISAT-Parent-letter-color-8-28-13.pdf" target="_blank">Common Core/ISAT Parent Letter</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://www.isbe.net/assessment/htmls/isat-cut-scores13.htm" target="_blank">Student Assessment (ISBE)</a></p></li> </ul> <p>This advanced display illustrates year-by-year performance on the ISAT under a common set of cut scores, allowing for a more accurate year-by-year comparison and a view of the shift in results due to the change in cut scores.</p> <p>In 2013, ISBE raised performance expectations on ISAT Reading and Mathematics. These higher expectations raised the “cut scores,” or the thresholds between different performance levels (such as “Below Standards” and “Meets Standards”) which resulted in a downward shift in the ranking of students in meeting or exceeding the new, more rigorous Reading and Math standards. </p> <p>The Old and New Cut Score buttons illustrate the shift in this school. Use the Grade, Subject, and Student Group options across the top of the screen to customize your view. (Note that this display only shows Reading and Mathematics as the Science cut scores have not changed.)</p> <p>A school demonstrating high state test results is likely to have multiple systems that support high levels of academic achievement. These may include a high level of teacher quality, advanced courses, and rigorous academic standards. Standardized tests results should be interpreted in the context of other measures of student achievement. </p> <ul> <li><a href="http://www.isbe.state.il.us/assessment/isat.htm" target="_blank">Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT)</a></li> </ul> <p>In January 2013, Illinois raised ISAT reading and math benchmarks. This means that since meeting or exceeding standards on the ISAT is harder this year, the percentage of students who score as meeting or exceeding standards has decreased. This does not reflect a decrease in the quality of schools, teachers, or student work - it reflects higher standards. Starting in 2014-2015, Illinois will replace the ISAT with a new test that is fully aligned to the Common Core State Standards, an effort with participation from more than 40 states to unify and raise standards.</p> <ul> <li><p><a href="http://commoncoreil.org/wp-content/uploads/2013/08/K-8-CC-ISAT-Parent-letter-color-8-28-13.pdf" target="_blank">Common Core/ISAT Parent Letter</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://www.isbe.net/assessment/htmls/isat-cut-scores13.htm" target="_blank">Student Assessment (ISBE)</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://ccsr.uchicago.edu/sites/default/files/publications/p0a04.pdf" target="_blank">Testing and Assessment in Illinois School Districts (Consortium on Chicago Schools Research)</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://www.nova.edu/ssss/QR/QR13-4/ballard.pdf" target="_blank">Making a Connection between Student Achievement, Teacher Accountability and Quality Classroom Instruction (Qualitative Report)</a></p></li> </ul> <p>This advanced display illustrates year-by-year performance on the ISAT under a common set of cut scores, allowing for a more accurate year-by-year comparison and a view of the shift in results due to the change in cut scores.</p> <p>In 2013, ISBE raised performance expectations on ISAT Reading and Mathematics. These higher expectations raised the “cut scores,” or the thresholds between different performance levels (such as “Below Standards” and “Meets Standards”) which resulted in a downward shift in the ranking of students in meeting or exceeding the new, more rigorous Reading and Math standards. </p> <p>The Old and New Cut Score buttons illustrate the shift in this school. Use the Grade, Subject, and Student Group options across the top of the screen to customize your view. (Note that this display only shows Reading and Mathematics as the Science cut scores have not changed.)</p> <p>A school demonstrating high state test results is likely to have multiple systems that support high levels of academic achievement. These may include a high level of teacher quality, advanced courses, and rigorous academic standards. Standardized tests results should be interpreted in the context of other measures of student achievement. </p> <ul> <li><a href="http://www.isbe.state.il.us/assessment/isat.htm" target="_blank">Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT)</a></li> </ul> <p>In January 2013, Illinois raised ISAT reading and math benchmarks. This means that since meeting or exceeding standards on the ISAT is harder this year, the percentage of students who score as meeting or exceeding standards has decreased. This does not reflect a decrease in the quality of schools, teachers, or student work - it reflects higher standards. Starting in 2014-2015, Illinois will replace the ISAT with a new test that is fully aligned to the Common Core State Standards, an effort with participation from more than 40 states to unify and raise standards.</p> <ul> <li><p><a href="http://commoncoreil.org/wp-content/uploads/2013/08/K-8-CC-ISAT-Parent-letter-color-8-28-13.pdf" target="_blank">Common Core/ISAT Parent Letter</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://www.isbe.net/assessment/htmls/isat-cut-scores13.htm" target="_blank">Student Assessment (ISBE)</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://ccsr.uchicago.edu/sites/default/files/publications/p0a04.pdf" target="_blank">Testing and Assessment in Illinois School Districts (Consortium on Chicago Schools Research)</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://www.nova.edu/ssss/QR/QR13-4/ballard.pdf" target="_blank">Making a Connection between Student Achievement, Teacher Accountability and Quality Classroom Instruction (Qualitative Report)</a></p></li> </ul> <p>This advanced display illustrates year-by-year performance on the ISAT under a common set of cut scores, allowing for a more accurate year-by-year comparison and a view of the shift in results due to the change in cut scores.</p> <p>In 2013, ISBE raised performance expectations on ISAT Reading and Mathematics. These higher expectations raised the “cut scores,” or the thresholds between different performance levels (such as “Below Standards” and “Meets Standards”) which resulted in a downward shift in the ranking of students in meeting or exceeding the new, more rigorous Reading and Math standards. </p> <p>The Old and New Cut Score buttons illustrate the shift in this school. Use the Grade, Subject, and Student Group options across the top of the screen to customize your view. (Note that this display only shows Reading and Mathematics as the Science cut scores have not changed.)</p> <p>A school demonstrating high state test results is likely to have multiple systems that support high levels of academic achievement. These may include a high level of teacher quality, advanced courses, and rigorous academic standards. Standardized tests results should be interpreted in the context of other measures of student achievement. </p> <ul> <li><a href="http://www.isbe.state.il.us/assessment/isat.htm" target="_blank">Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT)</a></li> </ul> <p>In January 2013, Illinois raised ISAT reading and math benchmarks. This means that since meeting or exceeding standards on the ISAT is harder this year, the percentage of students who score as meeting or exceeding standards has decreased. This does not reflect a decrease in the quality of schools, teachers, or student work - it reflects higher standards. Starting in 2014-2015, Illinois will replace the ISAT with a new test that is fully aligned to the Common Core State Standards, an effort with participation from more than 40 states to unify and raise standards.</p> <ul> <li><p><a href="http://commoncoreil.org/wp-content/uploads/2013/08/K-8-CC-ISAT-Parent-letter-color-8-28-13.pdf" target="_blank">Common Core/ISAT Parent Letter</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://www.isbe.net/assessment/htmls/isat-cut-scores13.htm" target="_blank">Student Assessment (ISBE)</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://ccsr.uchicago.edu/sites/default/files/publications/p0a04.pdf" target="_blank">Testing and Assessment in Illinois School Districts (Consortium on Chicago Schools Research)</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://www.nova.edu/ssss/QR/QR13-4/ballard.pdf" target="_blank">Making a Connection between Student Achievement, Teacher Accountability and Quality Classroom Instruction (Qualitative Report)</a></p></li> </ul> <p>This advanced display illustrates year-by-year performance on the ISAT under a common set of cut scores, allowing for a more accurate year-by-year comparison and a view of the shift in results due to the change in cut scores.</p> <p>In 2013, ISBE raised performance expectations on ISAT Reading and Mathematics. These higher expectations raised the “cut scores,” or the thresholds between different performance levels (such as “Below Standards” and “Meets Standards”) which resulted in a downward shift in the ranking of students in meeting or exceeding the new, more rigorous Reading and Math standards. </p> <p>The Old and New Cut Score buttons illustrate the shift in this district. Use the Grade, Subject, and Student Group options across the top of the screen to customize your view. (Note that this display only shows Reading and Mathematics as the Science cut scores have not changed.)</p> <p>A school demonstrating high state test results is likely to have multiple systems that support high levels of academic achievement. These may include a high level of teacher quality, advanced courses, and rigorous academic standards. Standardized tests results should be interpreted in the context of other measures of student achievement. </p> <ul> <li><a href="http://www.isbe.state.il.us/assessment/isat.htm">Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT)</a></li> </ul> <p>In January 2013, Illinois raised ISAT reading and math benchmarks. This means that since meeting or exceeding standards on the ISAT is harder this year, the percentage of students who score as meeting or exceeding standards has decreased. This does not reflect a decrease in the quality of schools, teachers, or student work - it reflects higher standards. Starting in 2014-2015, Illinois will replace the ISAT with a new test that is fully aligned to the Common Core State Standards, an effort with participation from more than 40 states to unify and raise standards.</p> <ul> <li><p><a href="http://commoncoreil.org/wp-content/uploads/2013/08/K-8-CC-ISAT-Parent-letter-color-8-28-13.pdf" target="_blank">Common Core/ISAT Parent Letter</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://www.isbe.net/assessment/htmls/isat-cut-scores13.htm" target="_blank">Student Assessment (ISBE)</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://ccsr.uchicago.edu/sites/default/files/publications/p0a04.pdf" target="_blank">Testing and Assessment in Illinois School Districts (Consortium on Chicago Schools Research)</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://www.nova.edu/ssss/QR/QR13-4/ballard.pdf" target="_blank">Making a Connection between Student Achievement, Teacher Accountability and Quality Classroom Instruction (Qualitative Report)</a></p></li> </ul> <div class="view view1"> <p>This graph shows the percentage of students that meet or exceed state standards on the Prairie State Achievement Exam (PSAE). The buttons at the top allow you to select reading, mathematics, or composite (combined) scores.</p> <p>Click on “View Details” to see additional PSAE performance data, grade-level and subject-area results, and performance of student sub-groups.</p> </div> <div class="view view2"> <p>This display allows you to take a closer look at PSAE performance for this school.</p> <p>Subject: The drop-down menu gives access to All Subjects or to one at a time. Click “Go” to see your selection.</p> <p>Student Group: You can select All Student Groups averaged together or an individual sub-group. Use the Grade and Subject menus to customize your view. Click “Go” to see your selection.</p> <p>Comparisons: For any combination of the above menu selections, you can click “Add District Comparison” and/or “Add State Comparison” to see side-by-side results.</p> <p>Once you have made your selections, you can press the "Go!" button to display information. The "Excel" button downloads this information as an Excel file.</p> </div> <p>A school demonstrating high state test results is likely to have multiple systems that support high levels of academic achievement. These may include a high level of teacher quality, advanced courses, and rigorous academic standards. Standardized tests results should be interpreted in the context of other measures of student achievement.</p> <ul> <li><p>Prairie State Achievement Exam (PSAE)</p></li> </ul> <p>The PSAE measures 11th grade student achievement relative to the Illinois Learning Standards. It recognizes the excellent achievement of individual students whose scores qualify them for honors, and it measures the progress that schools have made in helping students meet the Illinois Learning Standards. The PSAE is a two-day examination. On the first day students take the ACT college readiness assessment. On the second day students take the ACT WorkKeys assessments in Applied Mathematics and Reading for Information in addition to a science assessment developed by the Illinois State Board of Education with the assistance of Illinois teachers (PSAE Day 2). All eligible grade 11 students, as defined by the ISBE Rule adopted in January 2011, took the PSAE in April/May 2013.</p> <p>For more information go to <a href="http://www.isbe.state.il.us/assessment/psae.htm" target="_blank">Prairie State Achievement Exam (PSAE)</a></p> <ul> <li><p><a href="http://ccsr.uchicago.edu/publications/understanding-prairie-state-achievement-exam-descriptive-report-analysis-student" target="_blank">Understanding the Prairie State Achievement Exam (Consortium on Chicago Schools Research)</a></p></li> </ul> <div class="view view1"> <p>This graph shows the percentage of students that meet or exceed state standards on the Prairie State Achievement Exam (PSAE). The buttons at the top allow you to select reading, mathematics, or composite (combined) scores.</p> <p>Click on “View Details” to see additional PSAE performance data, grade-level and subject-area results, and performance of student sub-groups.</p> </div> <div class="view view2"> <p>This display allows you to take a closer look at PSAE performance for this school.</p> <p>Subject: The drop-down menu gives access to All Subjects or to one at a time. Click “Go” to see your selection.</p> <p>Student Group: You can select All Student Groups averaged together or an individual sub-group. Use the Grade and Subject menus to customize your view. Click “Go” to see your selection.</p> <p>Comparisons: For any combination of the above menu selections, you can click “Add District Comparison” and/or “Add State Comparison” to see side-by-side results.</p> <p>Once you have made your selections, you can press the "Go!" button to display information. The "Excel" button downloads this information as an Excel file.</p> </div> <p>A school demonstrating high state test results is likely to have multiple systems that support high levels of academic achievement. These may include a high level of teacher quality, advanced courses, and rigorous academic standards. Standardized tests results should be interpreted in the context of other measures of student achievement.</p> <ul> <li><p>Prairie State Achievement Exam (PSAE)</p></li> </ul> <p>The PSAE measures 11th grade student achievement relative to the Illinois Learning Standards. It recognizes the excellent achievement of individual students whose scores qualify them for honors, and it measures the progress that schools have made in helping students meet the Illinois Learning Standards. The PSAE is a two-day examination. On the first day students take the ACT college readiness assessment. On the second day students take the ACT WorkKeys assessments in Applied Mathematics and Reading for Information in addition to a science assessment developed by the Illinois State Board of Education with the assistance of Illinois teachers (PSAE Day 2). All eligible grade 11 students, as defined by the ISBE Rule adopted in January 2011, took the PSAE in April/May 2013.</p> <p>For more information go to <a href="http://www.isbe.state.il.us/assessment/psae.htm" target="_blank">Prairie State Achievement Exam (PSAE)</a></p> <ul> <li><p><a href="http://ccsr.uchicago.edu/publications/understanding-prairie-state-achievement-exam-descriptive-report-analysis-student" target="_blank">Understanding the Prairie State Achievement Exam (Consortium on Chicago Schools Research)</a></p></li> </ul> <div class="view view1"> <p>This graph shows the percentage of students that meet or exceed state standards on the Prairie State Achievement Exam (PSAE). The buttons at the top allow you to select reading, mathematics, or composite (combined) scores.</p> <p>Click on “View Details” to see additional PSAE performance data, grade-level and subject-area results, and performance of student sub-groups.</p> </div> <div class="view view2"> <p>This display allows you to take a closer look at PSAE performance for this school.</p> <p>Subject: The drop-down menu gives access to All Subjects or to one at a time. Click “Go” to see your selection.</p> <p>Student Group: You can select All Student Groups averaged together or an individual sub-group. Use the Grade and Subject menus to customize your view. Click “Go” to see your selection.</p> <p>Comparisons: For any combination of the above menu selections, you can click “Add District Comparison” and/or “Add State Comparison” to see side-by-side results.</p> <p>Once you have made your selections, you can press the "Go!" button to display information. The "Excel" button downloads this information as an Excel file.</p> </div> <p>A school demonstrating high state test results is likely to have multiple systems that support high levels of academic achievement. These may include a high level of teacher quality, advanced courses, and rigorous academic standards. Standardized tests results should be interpreted in the context of other measures of student achievement.</p> <ul> <li><p>Prairie State Achievement Exam (PSAE)</p></li> </ul> <p>The PSAE measures 11th grade student achievement relative to the Illinois Learning Standards. It recognizes the excellent achievement of individual students whose scores qualify them for honors, and it measures the progress that schools have made in helping students meet the Illinois Learning Standards. The PSAE is a two-day examination. On the first day students take the ACT college readiness assessment. On the second day students take the ACT WorkKeys assessments in Applied Mathematics and Reading for Information in addition to a science assessment developed by the Illinois State Board of Education with the assistance of Illinois teachers (PSAE Day 2). All eligible grade 11 students, as defined by the ISBE Rule adopted in January 2011, took the PSAE in April/May 2013.</p> <p>For more information go to <a href="http://www.isbe.state.il.us/assessment/psae.htm" target="_blank">Prairie State Achievement Exam (PSAE)</a></p> <ul> <li><p><a href="http://ccsr.uchicago.edu/publications/understanding-prairie-state-achievement-exam-descriptive-report-analysis-student" target="_blank">Understanding the Prairie State Achievement Exam (Consortium on Chicago Schools Research)</a></p></li> </ul> <div class="view view1"> <p>This graph shows the percentage of students that meet or exceed state standards on the Prairie State Achievement Exam (PSAE). The buttons at the top allow you to select reading, mathematics, or composite (combined) scores.</p> <p>Click on “View Details” to see additional PSAE performance data, grade-level and subject-area results, and performance of student sub-groups.</p> </div> <div class="view view2"> <p>This display allows you to take a closer look at PSAE performance for this district.</p> <p>Subject: The drop-down menu gives access to All Subjects or to one at a time. Click “Go” to see your selection.</p> <p>Student Group: You can select All Student Groups averaged together or an individual sub-group. Use the Grade and Subject menus to customize your view. Click “Go” to see your selection.</p> <p>Comparisons: For any combination of the above menu selections, you can click “Add State Comparison” to see side-by-side results.</p> <p>Once you have made your selections, you can press the "Go!" button to display information. The "Excel" button downloads this information as an Excel file.</p> </div> <p>A district demonstrating high state test results is likely to have multiple systems that support high levels of academic achievement. These may include a high level of teacher quality, advanced courses, and rigorous academic standards. Standardized tests results should be interpreted in the context of other measures of student achievement.</p> <ul> <li><p>Prairie State Achievement Exam (PSAE)</p></li> </ul> <p>The PSAE measures 11th grade student achievement relative to the Illinois Learning Standards. It recognizes the excellent achievement of individual students whose scores qualify them for honors, and it measures the progress that schools have made in helping students meet the Illinois Learning Standards. The PSAE is a two-day examination. On the first day students take the ACT college readiness assessment. On the second day students take the ACT WorkKeys assessments in Applied Mathematics and Reading for Information in addition to a science assessment developed by the Illinois State Board of Education with the assistance of Illinois teachers (PSAE Day 2). All eligible grade 11 students, as defined by the ISBE Rule adopted in January 2011, took the PSAE in April/May 2013.</p> <p>For more information go to <a href="http://www.isbe.state.il.us/assessment/psae.htm" target="_blank">Prairie State Achievement Exam (PSAE)</a></p> <ul> <li><p><a href="http://ccsr.uchicago.edu/publications/understanding-prairie-state-achievement-exam-descriptive-report-analysis-student" target="_blank">Understanding the Prairie State Achievement Exam (Consortium on Chicago Schools Research)</a></p></li> </ul> <div class="view view1"> <p>This graph shows the percentage of students that meet or exceed state standards on the Prairie State Achievement Exam (PSAE). The buttons at the top allow you to select reading, mathematics, or composite (combined) scores.</p> <p>Click on “View Details” to see additional PSAE performance data, grade-level and subject-area results, and performance of student sub-groups.</p> </div> <div class="view view2"> <p>This display allows you to take a closer look at PSAE performance in Illinois.</p> <p>Subject: The drop-down menu gives access to All Subjects or to one at a time. Click “Go” to see your selection.</p> <p>Student Group: You can select All Student Groups averaged together or an individual sub-group. Use the Grade and Subject menus to customize your view. Click “Go” to see your selection.</p> <p>Once you have made your selections, you can press the "Go!" button to display information. The "Excel" button downloads this information as an Excel file.</p> </div> <p>A district demonstrating high state test results is likely to have multiple systems that support high levels of academic achievement. These may include a high level of teacher quality, advanced courses, and rigorous academic standards. Standardized tests results should be interpreted in the context of other measures of student achievement.</p> <ul> <li><p>Prairie State Achievement Exam (PSAE)</p></li> </ul> <p>The PSAE measures 11th grade student achievement relative to the Illinois Learning Standards. It recognizes the excellent achievement of individual students whose scores qualify them for honors, and it measures the progress that schools have made in helping students meet the Illinois Learning Standards. The PSAE is a two-day examination. On the first day students take the ACT college readiness assessment. On the second day students take the ACT WorkKeys assessments in Applied Mathematics and Reading for Information in addition to a science assessment developed by the Illinois State Board of Education with the assistance of Illinois teachers (PSAE Day 2). All eligible grade 11 students, as defined by the ISBE Rule adopted in January 2011, took the PSAE in April/May 2013.</p> <p>For more information go to <a href="http://www.isbe.state.il.us/assessment/psae.htm" target="_blank">Prairie State Achievement Exam (PSAE)</a></p> <ul> <li><p><a href="http://ccsr.uchicago.edu/publications/understanding-prairie-state-achievement-exam-descriptive-report-analysis-student" target="_blank">Understanding the Prairie State Achievement Exam (Consortium on Chicago Schools Research)</a></p></li> </ul> <p>This graph shows the racial/ethnic diversity of students at this school. By selecting "Show 5-year trend," you can see how the student body has changed over time. </p> <p>By selecting "Add CMO Comparison", "Add District Comparison" or "Add State Comparison," you can compare the racial/ethnic diversity at this particular school to the CMO*, district, and state averages.</p> <p>*Charter Management Organization</p> <p>The state collects demographic information on the student body, including racial/ethnic diversity.</p> <ul> <li><p><a href="http://www.usccr.gov/pubs/112806diversity.pdf" target="_blank">The Benefits of Racial and Ethnic Diversity in Elementary and Secondary Education (U.S. Commission on Civil Rights)</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://www.greatschools.org/find-a-school/defining-your-ideal/284-cultural-diversity-at-school.gs" target="_blank">How Important is Cultural Diversity at your School? (GreatSchools)</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://www.edweek.org/topics/diversity/index.html" target="_blank">Diversity: The latest news about diversity in schools (Education Week)</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://www.school-diversity.org/full_text.php" target="_blank">Reaffirming the Role of School Integration in K-12 Education Policy (National Coalition on School Diversity)</a></p></li> </ul> <p>This graph shows the racial/ethnic diversity of students at this school. By selecting "Show 5-year trend," you can see how the student body has changed over time. </p> <p>By selecting "Add District Comparison" or "Add State Comparison," you can compare the racial/ethnic diversity at this particular school to the district and state averages.</p> <p>The state collects demographic information on the student body, including racial/ethnic diversity.</p> <ul> <li><p><a href="http://www.usccr.gov/pubs/112806diversity.pdf" target="_blank">The Benefits of Racial and Ethnic Diversity in Elementary and Secondary Education (U.S. Commission on Civil Rights)</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://www.greatschools.org/find-a-school/defining-your-ideal/284-cultural-diversity-at-school.gs" target="_blank">How Important is Cultural Diversity at your School? (GreatSchools)</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://www.edweek.org/topics/diversity/index.html" target="_blank">Diversity: The latest news about diversity in schools (Education Week)</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://www.school-diversity.org/full_text.php" target="_blank">Reaffirming the Role of School Integration in K-12 Education Policy (National Coalition on School Diversity)</a></p></li> </ul> <p>This graph shows the racial/ethnic diversity of students at this school. By selecting "Show 5-year trend," you can see how the student body has changed over time. </p> <p>By selecting "Add District Comparison" or "Add State Comparison," you can compare the racial/ethnic diversity at this particular school to the district and state averages.</p> <p>The state collects demographic information on the student body, including racial/ethnic diversity.</p> <ul> <li><p><a href="http://www.usccr.gov/pubs/112806diversity.pdf" target="_blank">The Benefits of Racial and Ethnic Diversity in Elementary and Secondary Education (U.S. Commission on Civil Rights)</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://www.greatschools.org/find-a-school/defining-your-ideal/284-cultural-diversity-at-school.gs" target="_blank">How Important is Cultural Diversity at your School? (GreatSchools)</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://www.edweek.org/topics/diversity/index.html" target="_blank">Diversity: The latest news about diversity in schools (Education Week)</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://www.school-diversity.org/full_text.php" target="_blank">Reaffirming the Role of School Integration in K-12 Education Policy (National Coalition on School Diversity)</a></p></li> </ul> <p>This graph shows the racial/ethnic diversity of students in this district. By selecting "Show 5-year trend," you can see how the student body has changed over time. </p> <p>By selecting "Add State Comparison," you can compare the racial/ethnic diversity in this district to the state averages.</p> <p>The state collects demographic information on the student body, including racial/ethnic diversity.</p> <ul> <li><p><a href="http://www.usccr.gov/pubs/112806diversity.pdf‎" target="_blank">The Benefits of Racial and Ethnic Diversity in Elementary and Secondary Education (U.S. Commission on Civil Rights)</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://www.greatschools.org/find-a-school/defining-your-ideal/284-cultural-diversity-at-school.gs" target="_blank">How Important is Cultural Diversity at your School? (GreatSchools)</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://www.edweek.org/topics/diversity/index.html" target="_blank">Diversity: The latest news about diversity in schools (Education Week)</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://www.school-diversity.org/full_text.php" target="_blank">Reaffirming the Role of School Integration in K-12 Education Policy (National Coalition on School Diversity)</a></p></li> </ul> <p>This graph shows the racial/ethnic diversity of students in Illinois school districts. By selecting "Show 5-year trend," you can see how the student body has changed over time. </p> <p>The state collects demographic information on the student body, including racial/ethnic diversity.</p> <ul> <li><p><a href="http://www.usccr.gov/pubs/112806diversity.pdf‎" target="_blank">The Benefits of Racial and Ethnic Diversity in Elementary and Secondary Education (U.S. Commission on Civil Rights)</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://www.greatschools.org/find-a-school/defining-your-ideal/284-cultural-diversity-at-school.gs" target="_blank">How Important is Cultural Diversity at your School? (GreatSchools)</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://www.edweek.org/topics/diversity/index.html" target="_blank">Diversity: The latest news about diversity in schools (Education Week)</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://www.school-diversity.org/full_text.php" target="_blank">Reaffirming the Role of School Integration in K-12 Education Policy (National Coalition on School Diversity)</a></p></li> </ul> <p>This graph shows the percentage of students eligible to receive free or reduced-price lunches, live in substitute care, or whose families receive public aid. By selecting “Show 5-year trend,” you can review changes in the student body over time.</p> <p>By selecting "Add CMO Comparison", "Add District Comparison" or "Add State Comparison," you can compare the percentage of low-income students at this particular school to the CMO*, district, and state averages.</p> <p>*Charter Management Organization</p> <p>The State collects demographic information on the student body, including percentage of students who live in low income households. Students ages 3 to 17 meet the low-income criteria if they fulfill one or more of the following conditions:</p> <ul> <li><p>From a family that receives public aid (Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, Targeted Assistance for Needy Families)</p></li> <li><p>Living in institutions for neglected or delinquent children</p></li> <li><p>Being supported in foster homes with public funds</p></li> <li><p>Eligible to receive free or reduced-price lunches (according to United States Department of Agriculture’s guidelines)</p></li> </ul> <ul> <li><p><a href="http://www.brighthubeducation.com/teaching-methods-tips/11105-basics-of-title-1-funds/" target="_blank">Understanding the Basic of Title I Funds (Bright Hub Education)</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://www2.ed.gov/policy/elsec/leg/esea02/pg1.html" target="_blank">Title I: Improving the Academic Achievement of the Disadvantaged (U.S. Department of Education)</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://nces.ed.gov/fastfacts/display.asp?id=158" target="_blank">Fast Facts on Title I (National Center for Education Statistics)</a></p></li> </ul> <p>This graph shows the percentage of students eligible to receive free or reduced-price lunches, live in substitute care, or whose families receive public aid. By selecting “Show 5-year trend,” you can review changes in the student body over time.</p> <p>By selecting "Add District Comparison" or "Add State Comparison," you can compare the percentage of low-income students at this particular school to the district and state averages.</p> <p>The State collects demographic information on the student body, including percentage of students who live in low income households. Students ages 3 to 17 meet the low-income criteria if they fulfill one or more of the following conditions:</p> <ul> <li><p>From a family that receives public aid (Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, Targeted Assistance for Needy Families)</p></li> <li><p>Living in institutions for neglected or delinquent children</p></li> <li><p>Being supported in foster homes with public funds</p></li> <li><p>Eligible to receive free or reduced-price lunches (according to United States Department of Agriculture’s guidelines)</p></li> </ul> <ul> <li><p><a href="http://www.brighthubeducation.com/teaching-methods-tips/11105-basics-of-title-1-funds/" target="_blank">Understanding the Basic of Title I Funds (Bright Hub Education)</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://www2.ed.gov/policy/elsec/leg/esea02/pg1.html" target="_blank">Title I: Improving the Academic Achievement of the Disadvantaged (U.S. Department of Education)</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://nces.ed.gov/fastfacts/display.asp?id=158" target="_blank">Fast Facts on Title I (National Center for Education Statistics)</a></p></li> </ul> <p>This graph shows the percentage of students eligible to receive free or reduced-price lunches, live in substitute care, or whose families receive public aid. By selecting “Show 5-year trend,” you can review changes in the student body over time.</p> <p>By selecting "Add District Comparison" or "Add State Comparison," you can compare the percentage of low-income students at this particular school to the district and state averages.</p> <p>The State collects demographic information on the student body, including percentage of students who live in low income households. Students ages 3 to 17 meet the low-income criteria if they fulfill one or more of the following conditions:</p> <ul> <li><p>From a family that receives public aid (Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, Targeted Assistance for Needy Families)</p></li> <li><p>Living in institutions for neglected or delinquent children</p></li> <li><p>Being supported in foster homes with public funds</p></li> <li><p>Eligible to receive free or reduced-price lunches (according to United States Department of Agriculture’s guidelines)</p></li> </ul> <ul> <li><p><a href="http://www.brighthubeducation.com/teaching-methods-tips/11105-basics-of-title-1-funds/" target="_blank">Understanding the Basic of Title I Funds (Bright Hub Education)</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://www2.ed.gov/policy/elsec/leg/esea02/pg1.html" target="_blank">Title I: Improving the Academic Achievement of the Disadvantaged (U.S. Department of Education)</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://nces.ed.gov/fastfacts/display.asp?id=158" target="_blank">Fast Facts on Title I (National Center for Education Statistics)</a></p></li> </ul> <p>This graph shows the percentage of students eligible to receive free or reduced-price lunches, live in substitute care, or whose families receive public aid. By selecting “Show 5-year trend,” you can review changes in the student body over time.</p> <p>By selecting "Add State Comparison," you can compare the percentage of low-income students in this district to the state averages.</p> <p>The State collects demographic information on the student body, including percentage of students who live in low income households. Students ages 3 to 17 meet the low-income criteria if they fulfill one or more of the following conditions:</p> <ul> <li><p>From a family that receives public aid (Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, Targeted Assistance for Needy Families)</p></li> <li><p>Living in institutions for neglected or delinquent children</p></li> <li><p>Being supported in foster homes with public funds</p></li> <li><p>Eligible to receive free or reduced-price lunches (according to United States Department of Agriculture’s guidelines)</p></li> </ul> <ul> <li><p><a href="http://www.brighthubeducation.com/teaching-methods-tips/11105-basics-of-title-1-funds/" target="_blank">Understanding the Basic of Title I Funds (Bright Hub Education)</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://www2.ed.gov/policy/elsec/leg/esea02/pg1.html" target="_blank">Title I: Improving the Academic Achievement of the Disadvantaged (U.S. Department of Education)</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://nces.ed.gov/fastfacts/display.asp?id=158" target="_blank">Fast Facts on Title I (National Center for Education Statistics)</a></p></li> </ul> <p>This graph shows the percentage of students in Illinois schools who are eligible to receive free or reduced-price lunches, live in substitute care, or whose families receive public aid. By selecting “Show 5-year trend,” you can review changes in the student body over time.</p> <p>The State collects demographic information on the student body, including percentage of students who live in low income households. Students ages 3 to 17 meet the low-income criteria if they fulfill one or more of the following conditions:</p> <ul> <li><p>From a family that receives public aid (Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, Targeted Assistance for Needy Families)</p></li> <li><p>Living in institutions for neglected or delinquent children</p></li> <li><p>Being supported in foster homes with public funds</p></li> <li><p>Eligible to receive free or reduced-price lunches (according to United States Department of Agriculture’s guidelines)</p></li> </ul> <ul> <li><p><a href="http://www.brighthubeducation.com/teaching-methods-tips/11105-basics-of-title-1-funds/" target="_blank">Understanding the Basic of Title I Funds (Bright Hub Education)</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://www2.ed.gov/policy/elsec/leg/esea02/pg1.html" target="_blank">Title I: Improving the Academic Achievement of the Disadvantaged (U.S. Department of Education)</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://nces.ed.gov/fastfacts/display.asp?id=158" target="_blank">Fast Facts on Title I (National Center for Education Statistics)</a></p></li> </ul> <p>This graph shows the percentage of students at this school who are classified as English learners (ELs). By selecting “Show 5-year trend,” you can see changes in the student population over time. By selecting, "Add CMO Comparison", "Add District Comparison" or "Add State Comparison," you can compare the percentage of English learners at this particular school to the CMO*, district, and state averages.</p> <p>*Charter Management Organization</p> <p>According to Illinois’ current regulations, English learners (ELs) are students whose English proficiency is not yet sufficient to provide the students with the ability to successfully participate and achieve in classroom settings where the language of instruction is English. ELs are eligible for Transitional Bilingual Education (TBE) or Transitional Program of Instruction (TPI) services and any other appropriate language supports.</p> <p>Schools must provide additional services for ELs, to ensure that they meet the State's proficient level of achievement on State assessments, successfully achieve in classrooms where the language of instruction is English, and participate fully in the school setting. The implementation of appropriate EL programs (as those described in Illinois’ legislation) and any other language support services help English learners to succeed academically.</p> <ul> <li><p><a href="http://www.colorincolorado.org/article/12918/" target="_blank">Improving Achievement for English Learners: Conclusions from 2 Research Reviews (Colorin Colorado)</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://www.edweek.org/ew/issues/english-language-learners/" target="_blank">English Language Learners (Education Week)</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://www.ncte.org/library/NCTEFiles/Resources/PolicyResearch/ELLResearchBrief.pdf" target="_blank">English Language Learners (National Council of Teachers of English)</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://www.isbe.state.il.us/bilingual/htmls/ellparents.htm" target="_blank">A Guide to Your Children’s Schools: A Parent Handbook</a></p></li> </ul> <p>This graph shows the percentage of students at this school who are classified as English learners (ELs). By selecting “Show 5-year trend,” you can see changes in the student population over time. By selecting, "Add District Comparison" or "Add State Comparison," you can compare the percentage of English learners at this particular school to the district and state averages.</p> <p>According to Illinois’ current regulations, English learners (ELs) are students whose English proficiency is not yet sufficient to provide the students with the ability to successfully participate and achieve in classroom settings where the language of instruction is English. ELs are eligible for Transitional Bilingual Education (TBE) or Transitional Program of Instruction (TPI) services and any other appropriate language supports.</p> <p>Schools must provide additional services for ELs, to ensure that they meet the State's proficient level of achievement on State assessments, successfully achieve in classrooms where the language of instruction is English, and participate fully in the school setting. The implementation of appropriate EL programs (as those described in Illinois’ legislation) and any other language support services help English learners to succeed academically.</p> <ul> <li><p><a href="http://www.colorincolorado.org/article/12918/" target="_blank">Improving Achievement for English Learners: Conclusions from 2 Research Reviews (Colorin Colorado)</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://www.edweek.org/ew/issues/english-language-learners/" target="_blank">English Language Learners (Education Week)</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://www.ncte.org/library/NCTEFiles/Resources/PolicyResearch/ELLResearchBrief.pdf" target="_blank">English Language Learners (National Council of Teachers of English)</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://www.isbe.state.il.us/bilingual/htmls/ellparents.htm" target="_blank">A Guide to Your Children’s Schools: A Parent Handbook</a></p></li> </ul> <p>This graph shows the percentage of students at this school who are classified as English learners (ELs). By selecting “Show 5-year trend,” you can see changes in the student population over time. By selecting, "Add District Comparison" or "Add State Comparison," you can compare the percentage of English learners at this particular school to the district and state averages.</p> <p>According to Illinois’ current regulations, English learners (ELs) are students whose English proficiency is not yet sufficient to provide the students with the ability to successfully participate and achieve in classroom settings where the language of instruction is English. ELs are eligible for Transitional Bilingual Education (TBE) or Transitional Program of Instruction (TPI) services and any other appropriate language supports.</p> <p>Schools must provide additional services for ELs, to ensure that they meet the State's proficient level of achievement on State assessments, successfully achieve in classrooms where the language of instruction is English, and participate fully in the school setting. The implementation of appropriate EL programs (as those described in Illinois’ legislation) and any other language support services help English learners to succeed academically.</p> <ul> <li><p><a href="http://www.colorincolorado.org/article/12918/" target="_blank">Improving Achievement for English Learners: Conclusions from 2 Research Reviews (Colorin Colorado)</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://www.edweek.org/ew/issues/english-language-learners/" target="_blank">English Language Learners (Education Week)</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://www.ncte.org/library/NCTEFiles/Resources/PolicyResearch/ELLResearchBrief.pdf" target="_blank">English Language Learners (National Council of Teachers of English)</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://www.isbe.state.il.us/bilingual/htmls/ellparents.htm" target="_blank">A Guide to Your Children’s Schools: A Parent Handbook</a></p></li> </ul> <p>This graph shows the percentage of students in this district who are classified as English learners (ELs). By selecting “Show 5-year trend,” you can see changes in the student population over time. By selecting, "Add State Comparison," you can compare the percentage of English learners in this district to the state average.</p> <p>According to Illinois’ current regulations, English learners (ELs) are students whose English proficiency is not yet sufficient to provide the students with the ability to successfully participate and achieve in classroom settings where the language of instruction is English. ELs are eligible for Transitional Bilingual Education (TBE) or Transitional Program of Instruction (TPI) services and any other appropriate language supports.</p> <p>Districts must provide additional services for ELs, to ensure that they meet the State's proficient level of achievement on State assessments, successfully achieve in classrooms where the language of instruction is English, and participate fully in the school setting. The implementation of appropriate EL programs (as those described in Illinois’ legislation) and any other language support services help English learners to succeed academically.</p> <ul> <li><p><a href="http://www.colorincolorado.org/article/12918/" target="_blank">Improving Achievement for English Learners: Conclusions from 2 Research Reviews (Colorin Colorado)</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://www.edweek.org/ew/issues/english-language-learners/" target="_blank">English Language Learners (Education Week)</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://www.ncte.org/library/NCTEFiles/Resources/PolicyResearch/ELLResearchBrief.pdf" target="_blank">English Language Learners (National Council of Teachers of English)</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://www.isbe.state.il.us/bilingual/htmls/ellparents.htm" target="_blank">A Guide to Your Children’s Schools: A Parent Handbook</a></p></li> </ul> <p>This graph shows the percentage of students in Illinois schools who are classified as English learners (ELs). By selecting “Show 5-year trend,” you can see changes in the student population over time.</p> <p>According to Illinois’ current regulations, English learners (ELs) are students whose English proficiency is not yet sufficient to provide the students with the ability to successfully participate and achieve in classroom settings where the language of instruction is English. ELs are eligible for Transitional Bilingual Education (TBE) or Transitional Program of Instruction (TPI) services and any other appropriate language supports.</p> <p>Districts must provide additional services for ELs, to ensure that they meet the State's proficient level of achievement on State assessments, successfully achieve in classrooms where the language of instruction is English, and participate fully in the school setting. The implementation of appropriate EL programs (as those described in Illinois’ legislation) and any other language support services help English learners to succeed academically.</p> <ul> <li><p><a href="http://www.colorincolorado.org/article/12918/" target="_blank">Improving Achievement for English Learners: Conclusions from 2 Research Reviews (Colorin Colorado)</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://www.edweek.org/ew/issues/english-language-learners/" target="_blank">English Language Learners (Education Week)</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://www.ncte.org/library/NCTEFiles/Resources/PolicyResearch/ELLResearchBrief.pdf" target="_blank">English Language Learners (National Council of Teachers of English)</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://www.isbe.state.il.us/bilingual/htmls/ellparents.htm" target="_blank">A Guide to Your Children’s Schools: A Parent Handbook</a></p></li> </ul> <p>A school's Student Mobility rate is the percentage of students who transfer in or out of the school between the first school day of October and the last school day of the year, not including graduates.</p> <p>This graph shows the student mobility rate at this school. By selecting "Add CMO Comparison", "Add District Comparison" or "Add State Comparison," you can compare the mobility rate of students at this particular school to the CMO*, district, and state averages.</p> <p*Charter Management Organization</p> <p>Students may change schools for a variety of reasons such as a family move, a transfer to a school that better serves the student's needs, or an expulsion. Continual student turnover is shown to be potentially academically and socially disruptive to both ongoing and transferring students.</p> <ul> <li><p><a href="http://www.edweek.org/ew/issues/student-mobility/" target="_blank">Student Mobility (Education Week)</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://ecap.crc.illinois.edu/eecearchive/digests/2002/rumberger02.html" target="_blank">Student Mobility and Academic Achievement (Early Childhood and Parenting Collaborative)</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://archives.iasb.com/journal/j5030405.htm" target="_blank">Student Mobility Packs Problems (Illinois School Board Journal)</a></p></li> </ul> <p>A school's Student Mobility rate is the percentage of students who transfer in or out of the school between the first school day of October and the last school day of the year, not including graduates.</p> <p>This graph shows the student mobility rate at this school. By selecting "Add District Comparison" or "Add State Comparison," you can compare the mobility rate of students at this particular school to the district and state averages.</p> <p>Students may change schools for a variety of reasons such as a family move, a transfer to a school that better serves the student's needs, or an expulsion. Continual student turnover is shown to be potentially academically and socially disruptive to both ongoing and transferring students.</p> <ul> <li><p><a href="http://www.edweek.org/ew/issues/student-mobility/" target="_blank">Student Mobility (Education Week)</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://ecap.crc.illinois.edu/eecearchive/digests/2002/rumberger02.html" target="_blank">Student Mobility and Academic Achievement (Early Childhood and Parenting Collaborative)</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://archives.iasb.com/journal/j5030405.htm" target="_blank">Student Mobility Packs Problems (Illinois School Board Journal)</a></p></li> </ul> <p>A school's Student Mobility rate is the percentage of students who transfer in or out of the school between the first school day of October and the last school day of the year, not including graduates.</p> <p>This graph shows the student mobility rate at this school. By selecting "Add District Comparison" or "Add State Comparison," you can compare the mobility rate of students at this particular school to the district and state averages.</p> <p>Students may change schools for a variety of reasons such as a family move, a transfer to a school that better serves the student's needs, or an expulsion. Continual student turnover is shown to be potentially academically and socially disruptive to both ongoing and transferring students.</p> <ul> <li><p><a href="http://www.edweek.org/ew/issues/student-mobility/" target="_blank">Student Mobility (Education Week)</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://ecap.crc.illinois.edu/eecearchive/digests/2002/rumberger02.html" target="_blank">Student Mobility and Academic Achievement (Early Childhood and Parenting Collaborative)</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://archives.iasb.com/journal/j5030405.htm" target="_blank">Student Mobility Packs Problems (Illinois School Board Journal)</a></p></li> </ul> <p>A district’s Student Mobility rate is the percentage of students who transfer in or out of the district between the first school day of October and the last school day of the year, not including graduates.</p> <p>This graph shows the student mobility rate in this district. By selecting "Add State Comparison" you can compare the mobility rate of students in this district to the state averages.</p> <p>Students may change districts for a variety of reasons such as a family move, a transfer to a school that better serves the student's needs, or an expulsion. Continual student turnover is shown to be potentially academically and socially disruptive to both ongoing and transferring students.</p> <ul> <li><p><a href="http://www.edweek.org/ew/issues/student-mobility/" target="_blank">Student Mobility (Education Week)</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://ecap.crc.illinois.edu/eecearchive/digests/2002/rumberger02.html" target="_blank">Student Mobility and Academic Achievement (Early Childhood and Parenting Collaborative)</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://archives.iasb.com/journal/j5030405.htm" target="_blank">Student Mobility Packs Problems (Illinois School Board Journal)</a></p></li> </ul> <p>The Student Mobility rate is the percentage of students who transfer in or out of a school between the first school day of October and the last school day of the year, not including graduates.</p> <p>This graph shows the student mobility rate in Illinois.</p> <p>Students may change schools for a variety of reasons such as a family move, a transfer to a school that better serves the student's needs, or an expulsion. Continual student turnover is shown to be potentially academically and socially disruptive to both ongoing and transferring students.</p> <ul> <li><p><a href="http://www.edweek.org/ew/issues/student-mobility/" target="_blank">Student Mobility (Education Week)</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://ecap.crc.illinois.edu/eecearchive/digests/2002/rumberger02.html" target="_blank">Student Mobility and Academic Achievement (Early Childhood and Parenting Collaborative)</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://archives.iasb.com/journal/j5030405.htm" target="_blank">Student Mobility Packs Problems (Illinois School Board Journal)</a></p></li> </ul> <p>This graph shows the average number of students in each class at this school. By selecting "Add CMO Comparison", "Add District Comparison" or "Add State Comparison," you can compare the average class sizes at this particular school to the CMO*, district, and state averages.</p> <p>*Charter Management Organization</p> <p>Research shows that children in lower grades show the potential for higher achievement scores when they are in smaller classes. Many factors contribute to student achievement, and class size is only one part of this bigger picture. Special education classes are not included in this calculation.</p> <ul> <li><p><a href="http://www.brookings.edu/research/papers/2011/05/11-class-size-whitehurst-chingos" target="_blank">Class Size: What Research Says and What it Means for State Policy (Brookings Institution)</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://www.edweek.org/ew/issues/class-size/" target="_blank">Class Size (Education Week)</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://www.sesp.northwestern.edu/docs/publications/4831895245e0c30b399c6.pdf" target="_blank">Do Small Classes Reduce the Achievement Gap between Low and High Achievers? (Northwestern University)</a></p></li> </ul> <p>This graph shows the average number of students in each class at this school. By selecting "Add District Comparison" or "Add State Comparison," you can compare the average class sizes at this particular school to the district and state averages.</p> <p>Research shows that children in lower grades show the potential for higher achievement scores when they are in smaller classes. Many factors contribute to student achievement, and class size is only one part of this bigger picture. Special education classes are not included in this calculation.</p> <ul> <li><p><a href="http://www.brookings.edu/research/papers/2011/05/11-class-size-whitehurst-chingos" target="_blank">Class Size: What Research Says and What it Means for State Policy (Brookings Institution)</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://www.edweek.org/ew/issues/class-size/" target="_blank">Class Size (Education Week)</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://www.sesp.northwestern.edu/docs/publications/4831895245e0c30b399c6.pdf" target="_blank">Do Small Classes Reduce the Achievement Gap between Low and High Achievers? (Northwestern University)</a></p></li> </ul> <p>This graph shows the average number of students in each class at this school. By selecting "Add District Comparison" or "Add State Comparison," you can compare the average class sizes at this particular school to the district and state averages.</p> <p>Research shows that children in lower grades show the potential for higher achievement scores when they are in smaller classes. Many factors contribute to student achievement, and class size is only one part of this bigger picture. Special education classes are not included in this calculation.</p> <ul> <li><p><a href="http://www.brookings.edu/research/papers/2011/05/11-class-size-whitehurst-chingos" target="_blank">Class Size: What Research Says and What it Means for State Policy (Brookings Institution)</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://www.edweek.org/ew/issues/class-size/" target="_blank">Class Size (Education Week)</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://www.sesp.northwestern.edu/docs/publications/4831895245e0c30b399c6.pdf" target="_blank">Do Small Classes Reduce the Achievement Gap between Low and High Achievers? (Northwestern University)</a></p></li> </ul> <p>This graph shows the average number of students in each class at this district. By selecting "Add State Comparison," you can compare the average class sizes at this particular district to the state averages.</p> <p>Research shows that children in lower grades show the potential for higher achievement scores when they are in smaller classes. Many factors contribute to student achievement, and class size is only one part of this bigger picture. Special education classes are not included in this calculation.</p> <ul> <li><p><a href="http://www.brookings.edu/research/papers/2011/05/11-class-size-whitehurst-chingos" target="_blank">Class Size: What Research Says and What it Means for State Policy (Brookings Institution)</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://www.edweek.org/ew/issues/class-size/" target="_blank">Class Size (Education Week)</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://www.sesp.northwestern.edu/docs/publications/4831895245e0c30b399c6.pdf" target="_blank">Do Small Classes Reduce the Achievement Gap between Low and High Achievers? (Northwestern University)</a></p></li> </ul> <p>This graph shows the average number of students in each class in Illinois.</p> <p>Research shows that children in lower grades show the potential for higher achievement scores when they are in smaller classes. Many factors contribute to student achievement, and class size is only one part of this bigger picture. Special education classes are not included in this calculation.</p> <ul> <li><p><a href="http://www.brookings.edu/research/papers/2011/05/11-class-size-whitehurst-chingos" target="_blank">Class Size: What Research Says and What it Means for State Policy (Brookings Institution)</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://www.edweek.org/ew/issues/class-size/" target="_blank">Class Size (Education Week)</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://www.sesp.northwestern.edu/docs/publications/4831895245e0c30b399c6.pdf" target="_blank">Do Small Classes Reduce the Achievement Gap between Low and High Achievers? (Northwestern University)</a></p></li> </ul> <p>Principal Turnover will show the number of different principals who have led this school in the past six years.</p> <p>Effective principals can increase student achievement scores and reduce student absences and suspensions, actions which improve graduation rates. Research has shown that high principal turnover often leads to reduced teacher retention, and that both factors can have direct negative effects on student- and school-level achievement. </p> <p>However, a change in leadership can also be a part of a school or district's overall improvement plan (e.g. strong principals may be moved to lower performing schools, or weak principals may be removed from school leadership in general).</p> <ul> <li><p><a href="http://www.rand.org/content/dam/rand/pubs/technical_reports/2012/RAND_TR1191.pdf" target="_blank">RAND articles</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://shankerblog.org/wp-content/uploads/2012/07/fullerbakeryoung_aera2007.pdf" target="_blank">Working paper</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://www.iaoed.org/files/Edpol2.pdf" target="_blank">IAE report</a></p></li> </ul> <p>Principal Turnover will show the number of different principals who have led this school in the past six years.</p> <p>Effective principals can increase student achievement scores and reduce student absences and suspensions, actions which improve graduation rates. Research has shown that high principal turnover often leads to reduced teacher retention, and that both factors can have direct negative effects on student- and school-level achievement. </p> <p>However, a change in leadership can also be a part of a school or district's overall improvement plan (e.g. strong principals may be moved to lower performing schools, or weak principals may be removed from school leadership in general).</p> <ul> <li><p><a href="http://www.rand.org/content/dam/rand/pubs/technical_reports/2012/RAND_TR1191.pdf" target="_blank">RAND articles</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://shankerblog.org/wp-content/uploads/2012/07/fullerbakeryoung_aera2007.pdf" target="_blank">Working paper</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://www.iaoed.org/files/Edpol2.pdf" target="_blank">IAE report</a></p></li> </ul> <p>Principal Turnover will show the number of different principals who have led this school in the past six years.</p> <p>Effective principals can increase student achievement scores and reduce student absences and suspensions, actions which improve graduation rates. Research has shown that high principal turnover often leads to reduced teacher retention, and that both factors can have direct negative effects on student- and school-level achievement. </p> <p>However, a change in leadership can also be a part of a school or district's overall improvement plan (e.g. strong principals may be moved to lower performing schools, or weak principals may be removed from school leadership in general).</p> <ul> <li><p><a href="http://www.rand.org/content/dam/rand/pubs/technical_reports/2012/RAND_TR1191.pdf" target="_blank">RAND articles</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://shankerblog.org/wp-content/uploads/2012/07/fullerbakeryoung_aera2007.pdf" target="_blank">Working paper</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://www.iaoed.org/files/Edpol2.pdf" target="_blank">IAE report</a></p></li> </ul> <p>Principal Turnover will show the number of different principals who have led this school in the past six years.</p> <p>Effective principals can increase student achievement scores and reduce student absences and suspensions, actions which improve graduation rates. Research has shown that high principal turnover often leads to reduced teacher retention, and that both factors can have direct negative effects on student- and school-level achievement. </p> <p>However, a change in leadership can also be a part of a school or district's overall improvement plan (e.g. strong principals may be moved to lower performing schools, or weak principals may be removed from school leadership in general).</p> <p>N/A</p> <p>Principal Turnover will show the number of different principals who have led this school in the past six years.</p> <p>Effective principals can increase student achievement scores and reduce student absences and suspensions, actions which improve graduation rates. Research has shown that high principal turnover often leads to reduced teacher retention, and that both factors can have direct negative effects on student- and school-level achievement. </p> <p>However, a change in leadership can also be a part of a school or district's overall improvement plan (e.g. strong principals may be moved to lower performing schools, or weak principals may be removed from school leadership in general).</p> <p>N/A</p> <p>This graph shows the percentage of students at this school who receive special education services through an Individualized Education Plan (IEP). By selecting “Show 5-year trend,” you can see changes in the student body over time.</p> <p>By selecting "Add CMO Comparison", "Add District Comparison" or "Add State Comparison," you can compare the percentage of students receiving special education services at this particular school to the CMO*, district, and state averages.</p> <p>*Charter Management Organization</p> <p>Each special education student receives an Individualized Education Plan (IEP) that specifies supplemental services, modifications, and accommodations available to that student. For example, a student with a learning disability may have an IEP that allows for additional time on examinations or may allow assignments to be typed rather than hand-written.</p> <ul> <li><p><a href="http://www.isbe.state.il.us/spec-ed/pdfs/parent_guide/ch6-iep.pdf" target="_blank">ISBE Guide to Individualized Education Programs (Illinois State Board of Education)</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://www.isbe.state.il.us/assessment/pdfs/2012/iep_504_guidance.pdf" target="_blank">ISBE Assessment Accommodations, Students with Disabilities (Illinois State Board of Education)</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://webprod.isbe.net/LEAProfile/SearchCriteria1.aspx" target="_blank">ISBE Special Education Profiles (Illinois State Board of Education)</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://www2.ed.gov/parents/needs/speced/edpicks.jhtml" target="_blank">My Child’s Special Needs (U.S. Department of Education)</a></p></li> </ul> <p>This graph shows the percentage of students at this school who receive special education services through an Individualized Education Plan (IEP). By selecting “Show 5-year trend,” you can see changes in the student body over time.</p> <p>By selecting "Add District Comparison" or "Add State Comparison," you can compare the percentage of students receiving special education services at this particular school to the district and state averages.</p> <p>Each special education student receives an Individualized Education Plan (IEP) that specifies supplemental services, modifications, and accommodations available to that student. For example, a student with a learning disability may have an IEP that allows for additional time on examinations or may allow assignments to be typed rather than hand-written.</p> <ul> <li><p><a href="http://www.isbe.state.il.us/spec-ed/pdfs/parent_guide/ch6-iep.pdf" target="_blank">ISBE Guide to Individualized Education Programs (Illinois State Board of Education)</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://www.isbe.state.il.us/assessment/pdfs/2012/iep_504_guidance.pdf" target="_blank">ISBE Assessment Accommodations, Students with Disabilities (Illinois State Board of Education)</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://webprod.isbe.net/LEAProfile/SearchCriteria1.aspx" target="_blank">ISBE Special Education Profiles (Illinois State Board of Education)</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://www2.ed.gov/parents/needs/speced/edpicks.jhtml" target="_blank">My Child’s Special Needs (U.S. Department of Education)</a></p></li> </ul> <p>This graph shows the percentage of students at this school who receive special education services through an Individualized Education Plan (IEP). By selecting “Show 5-year trend,” you can see changes in the student body over time.</p> <p>By selecting "Add District Comparison" or "Add State Comparison," you can compare the percentage of students receiving special education services at this particular school to the district and state averages.</p> <p>Each special education student receives an Individualized Education Plan (IEP) that specifies supplemental services, modifications, and accommodations available to that student. For example, a student with a learning disability may have an IEP that allows for additional time on examinations or may allow assignments to be typed rather than hand-written.</p> <ul> <li><p><a href="http://www.isbe.state.il.us/spec-ed/pdfs/parent_guide/ch6-iep.pdf" target="_blank">ISBE Guide to Individualized Education Programs (Illinois State Board of Education)</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://www.isbe.state.il.us/assessment/pdfs/2012/iep_504_guidance.pdf" target="_blank">ISBE Assessment Accommodations, Students with Disabilities (Illinois State Board of Education)</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://webprod.isbe.net/LEAProfile/SearchCriteria1.aspx" target="_blank">ISBE Special Education Profiles (Illinois State Board of Education)</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://www2.ed.gov/parents/needs/speced/edpicks.jhtml" target="_blank">My Child’s Special Needs (U.S. Department of Education)</a></p></li> </ul> <p>This graph shows the percentage of students in this district who receive special education services through an Individualized Education Plan (IEP). By selecting “Show 5-year trend,” you can see changes in the student body over time.</p> <p>By selecting "Add State Comparison," you can compare the percentage of students receiving special education services in this district and state averages.</p> <p>Each special education student receives an Individualized Education Plan (IEP) that specifies supplemental services, modifications, and accommodations available to that student. For example, a student with a learning disability may have an IEP that allows for additional time on examinations or may allow assignments to be typed rather than hand-written.</p> <ul> <li><p><a href="http://www.isbe.state.il.us/spec-ed/pdfs/parent_guide/ch6-iep.pdf" target="_blank">ISBE Guide to Individualized Education Programs (Illinois State Board of Education)</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://www.isbe.state.il.us/assessment/pdfs/2012/iep_504_guidance.pdf" target="_blank">ISBE Assessment Accommodations, Students with Disabilities (Illinois State Board of Education)</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://webprod.isbe.net/LEAProfile/SearchCriteria1.aspx" target="_blank">ISBE Special Education Profiles (Illinois State Board of Education)</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://www2.ed.gov/parents/needs/speced/edpicks.jhtml" target="_blank">My Child’s Special Needs (U.S. Department of Education)</a></p></li> </ul> <p>This graph shows the percentage of students in Illinois schools who receive special education services through an Individualized Education Plan (IEP). By selecting “Show 5-year trend,” you can see changes in the student body over time.</p> <p>Each special education student receives an Individualized Education Plan (IEP) that specifies supplemental services, modifications, and accommodations available to that student. For example, a student with a learning disability may have an IEP that allows for additional time on examinations or may allow assignments to be typed rather than hand-written.</p> <ul> <li><p><a href="http://www.isbe.state.il.us/spec-ed/pdfs/parent_guide/ch6-iep.pdf" target="_blank">ISBE Guide to Individualized Education Programs (Illinois State Board of Education)</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://www.isbe.state.il.us/assessment/pdfs/2012/iep_504_guidance.pdf" target="_blank">ISBE Assessment Accommodations, Students with Disabilities (Illinois State Board of Education)</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://webprod.isbe.net/LEAProfile/SearchCriteria1.aspx" target="_blank">ISBE Special Education Profiles (Illinois State Board of Education)</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://www2.ed.gov/parents/needs/speced/edpicks.jhtml" target="_blank">My Child’s Special Needs (U.S. Department of Education)</a></p></li> </ul> <p>These graphs show the average spending per pupil in this school’s district. Detailed financial information is not available at the school level.</p> <p><strong>Instructional Spending Per Pupil</strong> includes only the activities directly dealing with the teaching of students or the interaction between teachers and students.</p> <p><strong>Operating Spending Per Pupil</strong> includes all costs for overall operations in this school’s district, including Instructional Spending, but excluding summer school, adult education, capital expenditures, and long-term debt payments.</p> <p>Instructional Spending Per Pupil includes only those costs that are directly used for teaching students and facilitating interaction between teachers and students.</p> <p>Operational Spending Per Pupil includes all costs associated with a district's operating costs over the regular school year, such as transportation, building maintenance, salaries, etc.</p> <p>The amount of money a district spends on each student is often greatly dependent upon the local tax base. Therefore, it is important to understand how this money is allocated to various school supports, such as transportation, teaching staff, student resources, school personnel resources, and other functions.</p> <ul> <li><p><a href="http://swampland.time.com/2013/09/12/most-states-now-spend-less-per-student-than-in-2008/" target="_blank">Most States Now Spend Less Per Student than in 2008 (Time)</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://www.census.gov/newsroom/releases/archives/governments/cb13-92.html" target="_blank">Per Student Public Education Spending Decreases in 2011 for First Time in Nearly Four Decades, Census Bureau Reports</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://scholarworks.umb.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1508&amp;context=nejpp" target="_blank">The Impact of School Spending on Student Achievement</a></p></li> </ul> <p>These graphs show the average spending per pupil in this school’s district. Detailed financial information is not available at the school level.</p> <p><strong>Instructional Spending Per Pupil</strong> includes only the activities directly dealing with the teaching of students or the interaction between teachers and students.</p> <p><strong>Operating Spending Per Pupil</strong> includes all costs for overall operations in this school’s district, including Instructional Spending, but excluding summer school, adult education, capital expenditures, and long-term debt payments.</p> <p>Instructional Spending Per Pupil includes only those costs that are directly used for teaching students and facilitating interaction between teachers and students.</p> <p>Operational Spending Per Pupil includes all costs associated with a district's operating costs over the regular school year, such as transportation, building maintenance, salaries, etc.</p> <p>The amount of money a district spends on each student is often greatly dependent upon the local tax base. Therefore, it is important to understand how this money is allocated to various school supports, such as transportation, teaching staff, student resources, school personnel resources, and other functions.</p> <ul> <li><p><a href="http://swampland.time.com/2013/09/12/most-states-now-spend-less-per-student-than-in-2008/" target="_blank">Most States Now Spend Less Per Student than in 2008 (Time)</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://www.census.gov/newsroom/releases/archives/governments/cb13-92.html" target="_blank">Per Student Public Education Spending Decreases in 2011 for First Time in Nearly Four Decades, Census Bureau Reports</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://scholarworks.umb.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1508&amp;context=nejpp" target="_blank">The Impact of School Spending on Student Achievement</a></p></li> </ul> <p>These graphs show the average spending per pupil in this school’s district. Detailed financial information is not available at the school level.</p> <p><strong>Instructional Spending Per Pupil</strong> includes only the activities directly dealing with the teaching of students or the interaction between teachers and students.</p> <p><strong>Operating Spending Per Pupil</strong> includes all costs for overall operations in this school’s district, including Instructional Spending, but excluding summer school, adult education, capital expenditures, and long-term debt payments.</p> <p>Instructional Spending Per Pupil includes only those costs that are directly used for teaching students and facilitating interaction between teachers and students.</p> <p>Operational Spending Per Pupil includes all costs associated with a district's operating costs over the regular school year, such as transportation, building maintenance, salaries, etc.</p> <p>The amount of money a district spends on each student is often greatly dependent upon the local tax base. Therefore, it is important to understand how this money is allocated to various school supports, such as transportation, teaching staff, student resources, school personnel resources, and other functions.</p> <ul> <li><p><a href="http://swampland.time.com/2013/09/12/most-states-now-spend-less-per-student-than-in-2008/" target="_blank">Most States Now Spend Less Per Student than in 2008 (Time)</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://www.census.gov/newsroom/releases/archives/governments/cb13-92.html" target="_blank">Per Student Public Education Spending Decreases in 2011 for First Time in Nearly Four Decades, Census Bureau Reports</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://scholarworks.umb.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1508&amp;context=nejpp" target="_blank">The Impact of School Spending on Student Achievement</a></p></li> </ul> <p>These graphs show the average spending per pupil in this district.</p> <p><strong>Instructional Spending Per Pupil</strong> includes only the activities directly dealing with the teaching of students or the interaction between teachers and students.</p> <p><strong>Operating Spending Per Pupil</strong> includes all costs for overall operations in this district, including Instructional Spending, but excluding summer school, adult education, capital expenditures, and long-term debt payments.</p> <p>Instructional Spending Per Pupil includes only those costs that are directly used for teaching students and facilitating interaction between teachers and students.</p> <p>Operational Spending Per Pupil includes all costs associated with a district's operating costs over the regular school year, such as transportation, building maintenance, salaries, etc.</p> <p>The amount of money a district spends on each student is often greatly dependent upon the local tax base. Therefore, it is important to understand how this money is allocated to various school supports, such as transportation, teaching staff, student resources, school personnel resources, and other functions.</p> <ul> <li><p><a href="http://swampland.time.com/2013/09/12/most-states-now-spend-less-per-student-than-in-2008/" target="_blank">Most States Now Spend Less Per Student than in 2008 (Time)</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://www.census.gov/newsroom/releases/archives/governments/cb13-92.html" target="_blank">Per Student Public Education Spending Decreases in 2011 for First Time in Nearly Four Decades, Census Bureau Reports</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://scholarworks.umb.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1508&amp;context=nejpp" target="_blank">The Impact of School Spending on Student Achievement</a></p></li> </ul> <p>These graphs show the average spending per pupil in Illinois.</p> <p><strong>Instructional Spending Per Pupil</strong> includes only the activities directly dealing with the teaching of students or the interaction between teachers and students.</p> <p><strong>Operating Spending Per Pupil</strong> includes all costs for overall operations, including Instructional Spending, but excluding summer school, adult education, capital expenditures, and long-term debt payments.</p> <p>Instructional Spending Per Pupil includes only those costs that are directly used for teaching students and facilitating interaction between teachers and students.</p> <p>Operational Spending Per Pupil includes all costs associated with a district's operating costs over the regular school year, such as transportation, building maintenance, salaries, etc.</p> <p>The amount of money a district spends on each student is often greatly dependent upon the local tax base. Therefore, it is important to understand how this money is allocated to various school supports, such as transportation, teaching staff, student resources, school personnel resources, and other functions.</p> <ul> <li><p><a href="http://swampland.time.com/2013/09/12/most-states-now-spend-less-per-student-than-in-2008/" target="_blank">Most States Now Spend Less Per Student than in 2008 (Time)</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://www.census.gov/newsroom/releases/archives/governments/cb13-92.html" target="_blank">Per Student Public Education Spending Decreases in 2011 for First Time in Nearly Four Decades, Census Bureau Reports</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://scholarworks.umb.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1508&amp;context=nejpp" target="_blank">The Impact of School Spending on Student Achievement</a></p></li> </ul> <p>These charts show the percentage of revenues for this district from the three primary funding sources - local, state, and federal (above) as well as the average revenue sources for all Illinois districts (below). Click <i>View Details</i> to see the percentages for the top five sources of district revenues. This display shows you the importance of local property taxes as compared to other local, state, and federal funding. You can also view 5 Year and 10 Year trends in funding.</p> <p>School districts in Illinois receive funds from three major sources – local, state, and federal. The percentage from each of these sources varies depending on many factors such as property values in the district, and state and federal programs. Local funds, the largest source in most districts, come primarily from property taxes. State funds, which are appropriated each year by the Illinois General Assembly, include general state aid and funding by formulas for specific needs such as special education, transportation, and facility construction or renovation. Federal funds help to support low-income students, special education, nutrition programs, and pre-school among other needs.</p> <p>By clicking on the 5 Year and 10 Year trends, you will be able to see how the percentages from each of the funding sources have varied over time. These variations can be caused by changes in the contributions at any of the three levels or by increasing or reducing programs in the schools.</p> <ul> <!--<li><p><a href="http://isbe.net/news/2014/may14.htm" target="_blank">Subgroup Performance and School Reform - The Center for Comprehensive School Reform and Improvement</a></p></li>--> <li><p><a href="http://www.isbe.net/funding/html/gsa.htm " target="_blank">General State Aid</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://www.isbe.state.il.us/budget/FY14/fact-sheet4-efab.pdf" target="_blank">Fact Sheet: Illinois Ranks Last in State Contribution to P-12 funding</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://www2.ed.gov/about/overview/fed/10facts/index.html?exp=3" target="_blank">Ten Facts about K-12 Education Funding</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://febp.newamerica.net/background-analysis/school-finance" target="_blank">Federal, State, and Local K-12 School Finance Overview (Federal Education Budget Project)</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://webprod1.isbe.net/ilearn/ASP/index.asp" target="_blank">A web tool for customized comparisons of Illinois school districts’ finances</a></p></li> </ul> <p>Districts pay for four general functions – instruction, general administration, support services, and others. The upper pie chart shows the percentages of each type of expenditure during the past year. The lower chart displays the average percentages of expenditures by all public school districts in Illinois.</p> <p>Click on View Details to see the percentages of expenditures from the eight funds which are prescribed by Illinois state law. Unclick the box to go back to the chart that shows functions.</p> <p>For a look at long-term spending patterns, click on five year or ten year trends.</p> <p>Use the Excel icon to download any of these graphs to a spreadsheet.</p> <p>A typical school district spends about two-thirds of its budget on compensation for employees, about one-fourth on maintaining safe and comfortable buildings, and the remainder for equipment and supplies. School budgets address the functions shown in the first chart, which cover everything from paying teachers, to heating buildings, data processing, risk management, food service, transportation, bond payments, and many other activities.</p> <p>Local school boards determine their budgets in an annual process prescribed by state law. Budget-making includes public hearings, posting of proposed budgets, and discussion by the school board. Illinois state law also establishes eight school district funds for the allocation of spending and a rigorous schedule for reporting of school budgets and actual expenditures. </p> <p>Five and ten-year trends allow you to track changes in expenditures over time. Variations from year to year may reflect local activities such as building a new school, which would be reflected in a higher percentage of expenditures from the Site and Construction Fund. Other changes may result from increases or decreases in state and federal funding and program mandates, as determined by the Illinois General Assembly at the state level and the U.S. Congress at the federal level. </p> <ul> <li><p><a href="http://www.iasb.com/pdf/understandingsf.pdf" target="_blank">Understanding School Finance (Illinois Association of School Boards)</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://www.iasb.com/pdf/playingfair.pdf" target="_blank">Playing Fair with the Children of Illinois (Illinois Association of School Boards)</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://www.aasa.org/uploadedFiles/Policy_and_Advocacy/files/SchoolBudgetBriefFINAL.pdf" target="_blank">School Budgets 101 (American Association of School Administrators) </a></p></li> </ul> <p>Districts pay for four general functions – instruction, general administration, support services, and “others.” The pie chart shows the dollar amount of each type of expenditure during the past year in this school district. </p> <p>Click on View Details to see the amounts of expenditures from the eight funds which are established by Illinois state law. Unclick the box to go back to the chart that shows functions.</p> <p>For a look at long-term spending patterns, click on 5 Year and 10 Year Trends. To see the amount of revenue on the 5 Year and 10 Year charts, mouse over each bar. </p> <p>Use the Excel icon to see the full dollar amounts and to download any of these graphs to a spreadsheet.</p> <p>A typical school district spends about two-thirds of its budget on compensation for employees, about one-fourth on maintaining safe and comfortable buildings, and the remainder for equipment and supplies. School budgets address the functions shown in the first chart, which cover everything from paying teachers, to heating buildings, data processing, risk management, food service, transportation, bond payments, and many other activities.</p> <p>Local school boards determine their budgets in an annual process prescribed by state law. Budget-making includes public hearings, posting of proposed budgets, and discussion by the school board. Illinois state law also establishes eight school district funds for the allocation of spending and an annual schedule for reporting of school budgets and actual expenditures.</p> <p>Five and ten-year trends allow you to track changes in expenditures over time. Variations from year to year may reflect local activities such as building a new school, which would be reflected in a higher amount of expenditures from the Site and Construction Fund. Other changes may result from increases or decreases in state and federal funding and program mandates, as determined by the Illinois General Assembly at the state level and the U.S. Congress at the federal level.</p> <ul> <li><p><a href="http://www.iasb.com/pdf/understandingsf.pdf" target="_blank">Understanding School Finance (Illinois Association of School Boards)</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://www.iasb.com/pdf/playingfair.pdf" target="_blank">Playing Fair with the Children of Illinois (Illinois Association of School Boards)</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://www.aasa.org/uploadedFiles/Policy_and_Advocacy/files/SchoolBudgetBriefFINAL.pdf" target="_blank">School Budgets 101 (American Association of School Administrators) </a></p></li> </ul> <p>These charts show the dollar amount of revenues for this district from the three primary funding sources - local, state, and federal. </p> <p>Click View Details to see the amounts for the top five sources of district revenues. </p> <p>The 5 Year and 10 Year Trend options display the variations in amounts of funding from various sources over time. To see the amount of revenue on the 5 Year and 10 Year charts, mouse over each bar. </p> <p>Click on the Excel icon to see a spreadsheet that shows actual dollar amounts, rather than the abbreviated numbers on this display.</p> <p>School districts in Illinois receive funds from three major sources – local, state, and federal. The dollar amount from each of these sources varies depending on many factors such as property values in the district, and state and federal programs. In this display, you can see the importance of local property taxes in supporting schools as compared to other local, state, and federal funding. </p> <p>Local funds, the largest source in most districts, come primarily from property taxes. State funds, which are appropriated each year by the Illinois General Assembly, include general state aid and funding by formulas for specific needs such as special education, transportation, and facility construction or renovation. Federal funds help to support low-income students, special education, nutrition programs, and pre-school among other needs.</p> <p>By clicking on the 5 Year and 10 Year trends, you will be able to see how the amounts from each of the funding sources have varied over time. These variations can be caused by changes in the contributions at any of the three levels or by increasing or reducing programs in the schools.</p> <ul> <li><p><a href="http://www.iasb.com/pdf/understandingsf.pdf" target="_blank">Understanding School Finance (Illinois Association of School Boards)</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://www.iasb.com/pdf/playingfair.pdf" target="_blank">Playing Fair with the Children of Illinois (Illinois Association of School Boards)</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://www.aasa.org/uploadedFiles/Policy_and_Advocacy/files/SchoolBudgetBriefFINAL.pdf" target="_blank">School Budgets 101 (American Association of School Administrators) </a></p></li> </ul> <p>The display allows you to see the comparison of test results between various subgroups. You may select from the filters listed on the right (Grade, Subject, Sub-group) to refine the display. After making any selection, click “Go!” to see the information.</p> <p>Grade: The drop-down menu allows you to select a Summary (all grades at this school averaged together) or Each Grade at this school. Note that the ISAT is administered in grades 3-8; the PSAE in grade 11.</p> <p>Subject: The drop-down menu gives access to All Subjects or to one at a time.</p> <p>Achievement Gap Groups: The drop-down menu allows you to select which pair of subgroups you would like to compare</p> <p>The "Excel" button downloads this information into an Excel file.</p> <p>Clicking “View Details” displays the exact percentage rates of the gaps . It also shows the number of students in each subgroup tested over several years. This information is displayed beneath each graph.</p> <p>In 2013, ISBE raised performance expectations to improve alignment of ISAT scores with the more rigorous Common Core State Standards that are now being implemented. These higher expectations raised the “cut scores,” or the thresholds between different performance levels (such as “Below Standards” and “Meets Standards”) which resulted in a downward shift in the number of students meeting or exceeding Reading and Math standards.</p> <p>Achievement gaps are evident when one group of students outperforms another group and the average scores indicate a significant difference between the groups that persists over time.</p> <p>Schools and districts that are narrowing achievement gaps share four key characteristics:</p> <ul> <li><p>Focus – clear and consistent goals, strategies, and leadership</p></li> <li><p>Rigorous curriculum – clearly defined, high expectations for student learning</p></li> <li><p>High quality teaching</p></li> <li><p>Necessary and frequent interventions to improve students’ learning</p></li> </ul> <ul> <li><p><a href="http://www.edpubs.gov/document/ed005137p.pdf" target="_blank">Closing the Gaps - The Education Trust</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://www.brookings.edu/~/media/research/files/reports/2008/9/22%20education%20loveless/0922_education_loveless.pdf" target="_blank">Closing the Achievement Gap Education Commission of the States</a></p></li> <!--<li><p><a href="http://www.isbe.state.il.us/curriculum/pdf/algebra_middle_school.pdf" target="_blank">Students Affected by the Achievement Gap - National Education Association </a></p></li>--> <li><p><a href="http://www.ascd.org/publications/educational-leadership/mar01/vol58/num06/Closing-the-Achievement-Gap.aspx">Closing the Achievement Gap - ASCD Educational Leadership</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://www.nas.org/articles/common_core_state_standards_the_achievement_gap">Common Core State Standards: The Achievement Gap - National Association of Scholars</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="https://www.gse.upenn.edu/node/269">Rethinking the Achievement Gap - Graduate School of Education Penn State University</a></p></li> </ul> <p>The display allows you to select specific subgroups for comparison. You may select from the following filters to refine the display.</p> <p>Grade: The drop-down menu allows you to select a Summary (all grades at this school averaged together) or Each Grade at this school. Note that the ISAT is administered in grades 3-8; the PSAE in grade 11. After making your selection(s), click “Go!” to see a new display.</p> <p>Subject: The drop-down menu gives access to All Subjects or to one at a time. After making this selection, click “Go!” to see the new information.</p> <p>Select Groups: Make selections by clicking on the check box for each subgroup that you want to have displayed on the charts. The data for the selected subgroup appears automatically. Unchecking a box will remove that subgroup’s data from the display.</p> <p>The "Excel" button downloads this information into an Excel file.</p> <p>Clicking “View Details” displays the exact percentage rates of achievement gaps. It also shows the number of students in each subgroup tested over several years. This information is displayed beneath each graph.</p> <p>In 2013, ISBE raised performance expectations to improve alignment of ISAT scores with the more rigorous Common Core State Standards that are now being implemented. These higher expectations raised the “cut scores,” or the thresholds between different performance levels (such as “Below Standards” and “Meets Standards”) which resulted in a downward shift in the number of students meeting or exceeding Reading and Math standards.</p> <p>Students may be counted in more than one subgroup. For example, a white student receiving free lunches would be counted in both “white” and “low-income” categories. Comparing subgroups is a useful tool for determining patterns and trends at academic, social, and economic levels. This information helps educators plan for instruction and interventions for struggling students, as well as programs and strategies to assist all learners.</p> <ul> <li><p><a href="http://www.education.com/reference/article/Ref_Subgroup_Performance/" target="_blank">Subgroup Performance and School Reform - The Center for Comprehensive School Reform and Improvement</a></p></li> <!--<li><p><a href="http://www.edsource.org/assets/files/SimStu05.pdf" target="_blank">Similar Students, Different Results: Why Do Some Schools Do Better? EdSource</a></p></li>--> <li><p><a href="http://people.uncw.edu/kozloffm/highperforminghighpoverty.pdf" target="_blank">Inside the Black Box of High Performing High Poverty Schools Prichard Committee for Academic Excellence</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://ies.ed.gov/ncee/pubs/20124056/pdf/20124056.pdf">The Inclusion of Students with Disabilities in School Accountability Systems Institute of Education Sciences</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://ies.ed.gov/ncee/edlabs/regions/west/pdf/REL_2012019.pdf">Comparing achievement trends in reading and math across Arizona public school student subgroups Institute for Education Sciences</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://ejse.southwestern.edu/article/viewFile/7797/5564">Comparing achievement trends in reading and math across Arizona public school student subgroups - Institute for Education Sciences</a></p></li> </ul> <p>Middle School Students Passing Algebra will show the percentage of students at this school or district who took and passed Algebra I by the end of 8th grade.</p> <p>Algebra is considered a "gateway" course for the sequence of mathematics and science courses that prepare students for success in later schooling. The earlier a student successfully completes Algebra and progresses to courses such as Geometry and Algebra II, the more opportunities he or she has for reaching higher level mathematics courses. Students completing higher-level mathematics courses are more likely to enter and complete a college degree.</p> <ul> <li><p><a href="http://www.edpubs.gov/document/ed005137p.pdf" target="_blank">IES article</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://www.brookings.edu/~/media/research/files/reports/2008/9/22%20education%20loveless/0922_education_loveless.pdf" target="_blank">Brookings Institution report</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://www.isbe.state.il.us/curriculum/pdf/algebra_middle_school.pdf" target="_blank">Link 3</a></p></li> </ul> <p>This graph shows the percentage of students who enrolled in post-secondary institutions within 2 semesters of high school graduation. By selecting "Add District Comparison" or "Add State Comparison," you can compare the Post-Secondary Enrollment at this particular school to the district and state averages.</p> <p>Students who graduate from high school and pursue further education in a post-secondary institution, including colleges, universities, community colleges, vocational schools and training programs leading to career certification, have access to more career opportunities and on average have much higher income potential than those who only graduate from high school.</p> <ul> <li><p><a href="http://ccsr.uchicago.edu/sites/default/files/publications/Postsecondary.pdf" target="_blank">CCSR report</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://ccsr.uchicago.edu/downloads/1835ccsr_potholes_summary.pdf" target="_blank">CCSR article</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://www.bls.gov/emp/ep_chart_001.htm" target="_blank">Labor statistics</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://pas.indiana.edu/pdf/National%20Postsecondary%20Enrollment%20Trends.pdf" target="_blank">NSCRC report</a></p></li> </ul> <div class="view view1"> <p>This graph shows the percentage of students that scored at least a 21 (composite) on the ACT and therefore are classified as Ready for College Coursework. Click on “View Details” to review students’ readiness for college coursework in the four separate ACT subject areas.</p> </div> <div class="view view2"> <p>While the composite ACT score is a simple way to gauge college readiness, ACT has determined subject-level benchmarks that more precisely measure college readiness in each individual subject. The ACT College Readiness Benchmarks are as follows: English has a benchmark of 18, Mathematics has a benchmark of 22, Reading has a benchmark of 22, and Science has a benchmark of 23.</p> <p>The chart above shows the percentage of students who meet the ACT College Readiness Benchmarks for each individual subject and also the percentage of students who meet the Benchmarks for all four subjects.</p> <p>By selecting "Add CMO Comparison", "Add District Comparison" or "Add State Comparison", you can compare readiness in the subject areas to district and state averages.</p> </div> <p>A college-ready composite score of 21 or higher on the ACT shows that students have learned important academic skills that they will need in order to succeed in college and careers. While academic preparation is an essential part of readiness for college and careers, students also need persistence, motivation, time management, and technical skills.</p> <ul> <li><p><a href="http://www.isbe.net/news/2012/aug22.htm" target="_blank">Number of Students College Ready Increases (Illinois State Board of Education)</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="https://www2.ed.gov/about/bdscomm/list/hiedfuture/reports/kirst-venezia.pdf" target="_blank">Improving College Readiness and Success for All Students (Secretary of Education's Commission on the Future of Higher Education)</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://www.csub.edu/eap-riap/day1/Rethinking%20College%20Readiness.pdf" target="_blank">Rethinking College Readiness (Wiley InterScience)</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://www.act.org/solutions/college-career-readiness/college-readiness-benchmarks/" target="_blank">College Readiness Benchmarks (ACT)</a></p></li> </ul> <div class="view view1"> <p>This graph shows the percentage of students that scored at least a 21 (composite) on the ACT and therefore are classified as Ready for College Coursework. Click on “View Details” to review students’ readiness for college coursework in the four separate ACT subject areas.</p> </div> <div class="view view2"> <p>While the composite ACT score is a simple way to gauge college readiness, ACT has determined subject-level benchmarks that more precisely measure college readiness in each individual subject. The ACT College Readiness Benchmarks are as follows: English has a benchmark of 18, Mathematics has a benchmark of 22, Reading has a benchmark of 22, and Science has a benchmark of 23.</p> <p>The chart above shows the percentage of students who meet the ACT College Readiness Benchmarks for each individual subject and also the percentage of students who meet the Benchmarks for all four subjects.</p> <p>By selecting “Add District Comparison” or “Add State Comparison,” you can compare readiness in the subject areas to district and state averages.</p> </div> <p>A college-ready composite score of 21 or higher on the ACT shows that students have learned important academic skills that they will need in order to succeed in college and careers. While academic preparation is an essential part of readiness for college and careers, students also need persistence, motivation, time management, and technical skills.</p> <ul> <li><p><a href="http://www.isbe.net/news/2012/aug22.htm" target="_blank">Number of Students College Ready Increases (Illinois State Board of Education)</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="https://www2.ed.gov/about/bdscomm/list/hiedfuture/reports/kirst-venezia.pdf" target="_blank">Improving College Readiness and Success for All Students (Secretary of Education's Commission on the Future of Higher Education)</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://www.csub.edu/eap-riap/day1/Rethinking%20College%20Readiness.pdf" target="_blank">Rethinking College Readiness (Wiley InterScience)</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://www.act.org/solutions/college-career-readiness/college-readiness-benchmarks/" target="_blank">College Readiness Benchmarks (ACT)</a></p></li> </ul> <div class="view view1"> <p>This graph shows the percentage of students that scored at least a 21 (composite) on the ACT and therefore are classified as Ready for College Coursework. Click on “View Details” to review students’ readiness for college coursework in the four separate ACT subject areas.</p> </div> <div class="view view2"> <p>While the composite ACT score is a simple way to gauge college readiness, ACT has determined subject-level benchmarks that more precisely measure college readiness in each individual subject. The ACT College Readiness Benchmarks are as follows: English has a benchmark of 18, Mathematics has a benchmark of 22, Reading has a benchmark of 22, and Science has a benchmark of 23.</p> <p>The chart above shows the percentage of students who meet the ACT College Readiness Benchmarks for each individual subject and also the percentage of students who meet the Benchmarks for all four subjects.</p> <p>By selecting “Add District Comparison” or “Add State Comparison,” you can compare readiness in the subject areas to district and state averages.</p> </div> <p>A college-ready composite score of 21 or higher on the ACT shows that students have learned important academic skills that they will need in order to succeed in college and careers. While academic preparation is an essential part of readiness for college and careers, students also need persistence, motivation, time management, and technical skills.</p> <ul> <li><p><a href="http://www.isbe.net/news/2012/aug22.htm" target="_blank">Number of Students College Ready Increases (Illinois State Board of Education)</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="https://www2.ed.gov/about/bdscomm/list/hiedfuture/reports/kirst-venezia.pdf" target="_blank">Improving College Readiness and Success for All Students (Secretary of Education's Commission on the Future of Higher Education)</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://www.csub.edu/eap-riap/day1/Rethinking%20College%20Readiness.pdf" target="_blank">Rethinking College Readiness (Wiley InterScience)</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://www.act.org/solutions/college-career-readiness/college-readiness-benchmarks/" target="_blank">College Readiness Benchmarks (ACT)</a></p></li> </ul> <div class="view view1"> <p>These graphs show the percentage of students that scored at least a 21 (composite) on the ACT and therefore are classified as Ready for College Coursework. Click on “View Details” to review students’ readiness for college coursework in the four separate ACT subject areas.</p> </div> <div class="view view2"> <p>While the composite ACT score is a simple way to gauge college readiness, ACT has determined subject-level benchmarks that more precisely measure college readiness in each individual subject. The ACT College Readiness Benchmarks are as follows: English has a benchmark of 18, Mathematics has a benchmark of 22, Reading has a benchmark of 22, and Science has a benchmark of 23.</p> <p>The chart above shows the percentage of students who meet the ACT College Readiness Benchmarks for each individual subject and also the percentage of students who meet the Benchmarks for all four subjects.</p> <p>By selecting “Add State Comparison,” you can compare readiness in the subject areas to district and state averages.</p> </div> <p>A college-ready composite score of 21 or higher on the ACT shows that students have learned important academic skills that they will need in order to succeed in college and careers. While academic preparation is an essential part of readiness for college and careers, students also need persistence, motivation, time management, and technical skills.</p> <ul> <li><p><a href="http://www.isbe.net/news/2012/aug22.htm" target="_blank">Number of Students College Ready Increases (Illinois State Board of Education)</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="https://www2.ed.gov/about/bdscomm/list/hiedfuture/reports/kirst-venezia.pdf" target="_blank">Improving College Readiness and Success for All Students (Secretary of Education's Commission on the Future of Higher Education)</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://www.csub.edu/eap-riap/day1/Rethinking%20College%20Readiness.pdf" target="_blank">Rethinking College Readiness (Wiley InterScience)</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://www.act.org/solutions/college-career-readiness/college-readiness-benchmarks/" target="_blank">College Readiness Benchmarks (ACT)</a></p></li> </ul> <div class="view view1"> <p>These graphs show the percentage of students that scored at least a 21 (composite) on the ACT and therefore are classified as Ready for College Coursework. Click on “View Details” to review students’ readiness for college coursework in the four separate ACT subject areas.</p> </div> <div class="view view2"> <p>While the composite ACT score is a simple way to gauge college readiness, ACT has determined subject-level benchmarks that more precisely measure college readiness in each individual subject. The ACT College Readiness Benchmarks are as follows: English has a benchmark of 18, Mathematics has a benchmark of 22, Reading has a benchmark of 22, and Science has a benchmark of 23.</p> <p>The chart above shows the percentage of students who meet the ACT College Readiness Benchmarks for each individual subject and also the percentage of students who meet the Benchmarks for all four subjects.</p> </div> <p>A college-ready composite score of 21 or higher on the ACT shows that students have learned important academic skills that they will need in order to succeed in college and careers. While academic preparation is an essential part of readiness for college and careers, students also need persistence, motivation, time management, and technical skills.</p> <ul> <li><p><a href="http://www.isbe.net/news/2012/aug22.htm" target="_blank">Number of Students College Ready Increases (Illinois State Board of Education)</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="https://www2.ed.gov/about/bdscomm/list/hiedfuture/reports/kirst-venezia.pdf" target="_blank">Improving College Readiness and Success for All Students (Secretary of Education's Commission on the Future of Higher Education)</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://www.csub.edu/eap-riap/day1/Rethinking%20College%20Readiness.pdf" target="_blank">Rethinking College Readiness (Wiley InterScience)</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://www.act.org/solutions/college-career-readiness/college-readiness-benchmarks/" target="_blank">College Readiness Benchmarks (ACT)</a></p></li> </ul> <p>The 5Essentials survey evaluates essential components for school success.</p> <p>The 5-section pictogram above illustrates how the scores in each of the 5Essentials will be visually represented when the full reports are available in 2014. Schools, Charter Management Organization (CMO) and districts will be scored based on the extent of their implementation in each of the 5 essential factors for school organization based upon teacher and student surveys.</p> <p>The chart above indicates the 2013 survey response rate for students and teachers at this school. The survey was required for teachers of all grades and students in grades 6 through 12.</p> <p>The 5Essentials Survey results offer a comprehensive assessment of a school’s organizational culture, generating data that allows schools to develop improvement plans and target resources to areas known to be related to increases in student learning and outcomes. The survey also demonstrates that teachers and students can play a crucial role in school reform: What they share about their schools has been demonstrated to reliably predict whether those schools are likely to improve or stagnate.</p> <p>The University of Chicago developed and administered a version of the survey in the Chicago Public Schools (CPS) for the past 20 years, helping the city’s diverse schools develop pathways to improved student performance. The research has found that schools that are well organized, safe, and supportive are much more likely to be successful.</p> <p>In addition to CPS, school districts in Connecticut, Indiana, Louisiana, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri and New York have used the survey results to help frame and direct school improvement plans. While districts in these states have administered the survey, Illinois is the first state to administer the survey across all schools in its 860 districts.The 2013-14 School Report Card will show the scores from this norm-referenced survey, meaning school’s survey results will be compared to a specific normative – or similar – group. That means that each school will be scored next year against the statewide average for their particular school type, i.e. elementary schools to elementary schools, middle schools to middle schools and high schools to high schools.</p> <p>Schools that administered the 5Essentials Survey in 2013 are not required to administer the survey again in 2014, but are encouraged to do so in order to develop trend data. Schools that did not administer the survey in 2013 are required to administer the survey in 2014.</p> <ul> <li><p><a href="http://uchicagoimpact.org/5essentials/" target="_blank">University of Chicago 5Essentials Website</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://ccsr.uchicago.edu/publications/organizing-schools-improvement-lessons-chicago" target="_blank">Organizing Schools for Improvement: Lessons from Chicago (University of Chicago Consortium on School Research)</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://www.isbe.state.il.us/performance/html/5essentials.htm" target="_blank">ISBE 5Essentials Website</a></p></li> </ul> <p>The 5Essentials survey evaluates essential components for school success.</p> <p>The 5-section pictogram above illustrates how the scores in each of the 5Essentials will be visually represented when the full reports are available in 2014. Schools and districts will be scored based on the extent of their implementation in each of the 5 essential factors for school organization based upon teacher and student surveys.</p> <p>The chart above indicates the 2013 survey response rate for students and teachers at this school. The survey was required for teachers of all grades and students in grades 6 through 12.</p> <p>The 5Essentials Survey results offer a comprehensive assessment of a school’s organizational culture, generating data that allows schools to develop improvement plans and target resources to areas known to be related to increases in student learning and outcomes. The survey also demonstrates that teachers and students can play a crucial role in school reform: What they share about their schools has been demonstrated to reliably predict whether those schools are likely to improve or stagnate.</p> <p>The University of Chicago developed and administered a version of the survey in the Chicago Public Schools (CPS) for the past 20 years, helping the city’s diverse schools develop pathways to improved student performance. The research has found that schools that are well organized, safe, and supportive are much more likely to be successful.</p> <p>In addition to CPS, school districts in Connecticut, Indiana, Louisiana, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri and New York have used the survey results to help frame and direct school improvement plans. While districts in these states have administered the survey, Illinois is the first state to administer the survey across all schools in its 860 districts.The 2013-14 School Report Card will show the scores from this norm-referenced survey, meaning school’s survey results will be compared to a specific normative – or similar – group. That means that each school will be scored next year against the statewide average for their particular school type, i.e. elementary schools to elementary schools, middle schools to middle schools and high schools to high schools.</p> <p>Schools that administered the 5Essentials Survey in 2013 are not required to administer the survey again in 2014, but are encouraged to do so in order to develop trend data. Schools that did not administer the survey in 2013 are required to administer the survey in 2014.</p> <ul> <li><p><a href="http://uchicagoimpact.org/5essentials/" target="_blank">University of Chicago 5Essentials Website</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://ccsr.uchicago.edu/publications/organizing-schools-improvement-lessons-chicago" target="_blank">Organizing Schools for Improvement: Lessons from Chicago (University of Chicago Consortium on School Research)</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://www.isbe.state.il.us/performance/html/5essentials.htm" target="_blank">ISBE 5Essentials Website</a></p></li> </ul> <p>The 5Essentials survey evaluates essential components for school success.</p> <p>The 5-section pictogram above illustrates how the scores in each of the 5Essentials will be visually represented when the full reports are available in 2014. Schools and districts will be scored based on the extent of their implementation in each of the 5 essential factors for school organization based upon teacher and student surveys.</p> <p>The chart above indicates the 2013 survey response rate for students and teachers at this school. The survey was required for teachers of all grades and students in grades 6 through 12.</p> <p>The 5Essentials Survey results offer a comprehensive assessment of a school’s organizational culture, generating data that allows schools to develop improvement plans and target resources to areas known to be related to increases in student learning and outcomes. The survey also demonstrates that teachers and students can play a crucial role in school reform: What they share about their schools has been demonstrated to reliably predict whether those schools are likely to improve or stagnate.</p> <p>The University of Chicago developed and administered a version of the survey in the Chicago Public Schools (CPS) for the past 20 years, helping the city’s diverse schools develop pathways to improved student performance. The research has found that schools that are well organized, safe, and supportive are much more likely to be successful.</p> <p>In addition to CPS, school districts in Connecticut, Indiana, Louisiana, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri and New York have used the survey results to help frame and direct school improvement plans. While districts in these states have administered the survey, Illinois is the first state to administer the survey across all schools in its 860 districts.The 2013-14 School Report Card will show the scores from this norm-referenced survey, meaning school’s survey results will be compared to a specific normative – or similar – group. That means that each school will be scored next year against the statewide average for their particular school type, i.e. elementary schools to elementary schools, middle schools to middle schools and high schools to high schools.</p> <p>Schools that administered the 5Essentials Survey in 2013 are not required to administer the survey again in 2014, but are encouraged to do so in order to develop trend data. Schools that did not administer the survey in 2013 are required to administer the survey in 2014.</p> <ul> <li><p><a href="http://uchicagoimpact.org/5essentials/" target="_blank">University of Chicago 5Essentials Website</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://ccsr.uchicago.edu/publications/organizing-schools-improvement-lessons-chicago" target="_blank">Organizing Schools for Improvement: Lessons from Chicago (University of Chicago Consortium on School Research)</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://www.isbe.state.il.us/performance/html/5essentials.htm" target="_blank">ISBE 5Essentials Website</a></p></li> </ul> <p>The 5Essentials survey evaluates essential components for school success.</p> <p>The University of Chicago developed and administered a version of the survey in the Chicago Public Schools (CPS) for the past 20 years, helping the city’s diverse schools develop pathways to improved student performance. The research has found that schools that are well organized, safe, and supportive are much more likely to be successful.</p> <p>The chart above indicates the 2013 survey response rate for students and teachers in this district. The survey was required for teachers of all grades and students in grades 6 through 12.</p> <p>The 5Essentials Survey results offer a comprehensive assessment of a school’s organizational culture, generating data that allows schools to develop improvement plans and target resources to areas known to be related to increases in student learning and outcomes. The survey also demonstrates that teachers and students can play a crucial role in school reform: What they share about their schools has been demonstrated to reliably predict whether those schools are likely to improve or stagnate.</p> <p>The University of Chicago developed and administered a version of the survey in the Chicago Public Schools (CPS) for the past 20 years, helping the city’s diverse schools develop pathways to improved student performance. The research has found that schools that are well organized, safe, and supportive are much more likely to be successful.</p> <p>In addition to CPS, school districts in Connecticut, Indiana, Louisiana, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri and New York have used the survey results to help frame and direct school improvement plans. While districts in these states have administered the survey, Illinois is the first state to administer the survey across all schools in its 860 districts. The 2013-14 School Report Card will show the scores from this norm-referenced survey, meaning school’s survey results will be compared to a specific normative – or similar – group. That means that each school will be scored next year against the statewide average for their particular school type, i.e. elementary schools to elementary schools, middle schools to middle schools and high schools to high schools.</p> <p>Schools that administered the 5Essentials Survey in 2013 are not required to administer the survey again in 2014, but are encouraged to do so in order to develop trend data. Schools that did not administer the survey in 2013 are required to administer the survey in 2014.</p> <ul> <li><p><a href="http://uchicagoimpact.org/5essentials/" target="_blank">University of Chicago 5Essentials Website</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://ccsr.uchicago.edu/publications/organizing-schools-improvement-lessons-chicago" target="_blank">Organizing Schools for Improvement: Lessons from Chicago (University of Chicago Consortium on School Research)</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://www.isbe.state.il.us/performance/html/5essentials.htm" target="_blank">ISBE 5Essentials Website</a></p></li> </ul> <p>Teacher Retention will show the percentage of teachers who return to this school to work each year.</p> <p>A stable teaching staff can implement school-wide systems and strategies for increasing student achievement. These include close collaboration among teachers, students, and parents, which helps to improve learning. Some movement of teachers in and out of school is normal.</p> <ul> <li><p><a href="http://aer.sagepub.com/content/50/1/4" target="_blank">American Educational Research Journal article</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://depts.washington.edu/ctpmail/PDFs/TeacherRetention.pdf" target="_blank">CSTP report</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://cepa.stanford.edu/news/teacher-turnover-affects-all-students-achievement-study-indicates" target="_blank">CEPA article</a></p></li> </ul> <p>Teacher Retention will show the percentage of teachers who return to this school to work each year.</p> <p>A stable teaching staff can implement school-wide systems and strategies for increasing student achievement. These include close collaboration among teachers, students, and parents, which helps to improve learning. Some movement of teachers in and out of school is normal.</p> <ul> <li><p><a href="http://aer.sagepub.com/content/50/1/4" target="_blank">American Educational Research Journal article</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://depts.washington.edu/ctpmail/PDFs/TeacherRetention.pdf" target="_blank">CSTP report</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://cepa.stanford.edu/news/teacher-turnover-affects-all-students-achievement-study-indicates" target="_blank">CEPA article</a></p></li> </ul> <p>Teacher Retention will show the percentage of teachers who return to this school to work each year.</p> <p>A stable teaching staff can implement school-wide systems and strategies for increasing student achievement. These include close collaboration among teachers, students, and parents, which helps to improve learning. Some movement of teachers in and out of school is normal.</p> <ul> <li><p><a href="http://aer.sagepub.com/content/50/1/4" target="_blank">American Educational Research Journal article</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://depts.washington.edu/ctpmail/PDFs/TeacherRetention.pdf" target="_blank">CSTP report</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://cepa.stanford.edu/news/teacher-turnover-affects-all-students-achievement-study-indicates" target="_blank">CEPA article</a></p></li> </ul> <p>Teacher Retention will show the percentage of teachers who return to this school to work each year.</p> <p>A stable teaching staff can implement school-wide systems and strategies for increasing student achievement. These include close collaboration among teachers, students, and parents, which helps to improve learning. Some movement of teachers in and out of school is normal.</p> <p>N/A</p> <p>Teacher Retention will show the percentage of teachers who return to this school to work each year.</p> <p>A stable teaching staff can implement school-wide systems and strategies for increasing student achievement. These include close collaboration among teachers, students, and parents, which helps to improve learning. Some movement of teachers in and out of school is normal.</p> <p>N/A</p> <p>The Teacher Attendance measure will show the percentage of teachers with fewer than 10 absences in a school year.</p> <p>No Context Available</p> <ul> <li><p><a href="#" target="_blank">Link 1</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="#" target="_blank">Link 2</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="#" target="_blank">Link 3</a></p></li> </ul> <p>This list shows Advanced Placement courses that this school offers.</p> <p>Advanced Placement courses are rigorous and designed to prepare high school students for college in a wide spectrum of areas from history to foreign language to natural science. Colleges often grant placement and course credit to students who obtain high scores on the examinations.</p> <ul> <li><p><a href="http://regents.ohio.gov/transfer/ap/documents/AP_CollegeBoard.pdf" target="_blank">Advanced Placement Program Validity Research and Recommendations for Providing Credit and/or Placement (College Board)</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://broadprize.org/symposium/2006BroadSymposiumRelationshipBetweenAPandCollegeGrad.pdf" target="_blank">The Relationship Between Advanced Placement and College Graduation (National Center for Educational Accountability)</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://cshe.berkeley.edu/sites/default/files/shared/publications/docs/ROP.Geiser.4.04.pdf" target="_blank">The Role of Advanced Placement and Honors Courses in College Admissions (Center for Studies in Higher Education at UC-Berkeley)</a></p></li> </ul> <p>This list shows International Baccalaureate courses that this school offers.</p> <p>International Baccalaureate courses may be useful for students interested in attending college. They provide practice with college-level coursework and may help demonstrate a student's skills to colleges during the admissions process.</p> <ul> <li><p><a href="http://ccsr.uchicago.edu/sites/default/files/publications/IB%20Report1.pdf" target="_blank">Working to My Potential: The Post Secondary Experience of CPS Students in the International Baccalaureate Programme (Consortium on Chicago School Research)</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://www.greatschools.org/school-choice/international-baccalaureate/6950-what-is-ib-international-baccalaureate.gs" target="_blank">What is International Baccalaureate? (Great Schools)</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://www.ibsom.org/uploads/9/0/6/3/9063770/current_trends_in_international_baccalaureate_programs_-_membership.pdf" target="_blank">Current Trends in International Baccalaureate Programs (Hanover Research)</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://www.ascd.org/publications/educational-leadership/may08/vol65/num08/How-IB-Prepares-Students.aspx" target="_blank">How IB prepares students (ASCD)</a></p></li> </ul> <p>This list shows foreign language courses that this school offers.</p> <p>Foreign language and cultural study have several benefits, including creative thinking and cultural awareness. In addition, foreign language acquisition helps prepare students to live in a global society. Foreign language course offerings can differ both in number of languages offered and course levels offered in each language.</p> <ul> <li><p><a href="http://www.ncssfl.org/papers/index.php?rationale" target="_blank">A Rationale for Foreign Language Education (National Council of State Supervisors for Languages)</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://www.districtadministration.com/article/second-language-learning" target="_blank">Second Language Learning (District Administration Magazine)</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://dana.org/news/cerebrum/detail.aspx?id=39638" target="_blank">The Cognitive Benefits of Being Bilingual (The Dana Foundation)</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://www2.gsu.edu/~wwwgcl/whyesfl.htm" target="_blank">Why, How, and When Should My Child Learn A Second Language (Georgia Coalition for Language Learning)</a></p></li> </ul> <p>This list shows before and after school care programs that this school offers. </p> <p>Before and after school care programs serve various purposes: safety and supervision, academic support, and cultural enrichment. Before and after school care offers opportunities to enhance students' social, emotional, behavioral, physical, and academic competencies, so that all students can succeed in school and beyond.</p> <ul> <li><p><a href="http://www.isbe.net/21cclc/html/resources.htm" target="_blank">21st= Century Community Learning Centers Research and Resources on Before and After School Programs (Illinois State Board of Education)</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://www.sp2.upenn.edu/ostrc/doclibrary/documents/OutcomesandResearchinOut-of-SchoolTimeProgramDesign.pdf" target="_blank">Outcomes and Research on Out of School Time Program Design (Out of School Time Resource Center)</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://www.equitycampaign.org/i/a/document/11242_after-school_report_10-7-09_web.pdf" target="_blank">Can After-School Programs Help Level the Academic Playing Field for Disadvantaged Youth? (Equity Campaign)</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://www.edweek.org/ew/issues/after-school-programs/" target="_blank">After School Programs (Education Week)</a></p></li> </ul> <p>This list shows all the Specialized Programs and Courses that this school offers.</p> <p>Before and after school care programs serve various purposes: safety and supervision, academic support, and cultural enrichment. Before and after school care offers opportunities to enhance students' social, emotional, behavioral, physical, and academic competencies so that all students can succeed in school and beyond.</p> <ul> <li><p><a href="http://www.csus.edu/oir/Assessment/Non-academic%20Program%20Assessment/Student%20Activities/Student%20Activity%20Report%202009.pdf" target="_blank">CSUS report</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://nces.ed.gov/pubs95/web/95741.asp" target="_blank">NCES article</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0273229711000359" target="_blank">Developmental Review article</a></p></li> </ul> <p>This list shows Career and Technical Education (CTE) programs that this school offers, including ROTC and similar pre-military training programs.</p> <p>CTE programs prepare students for the workplace by building academic, vocational, career planning, and citizenship skills. These courses are useful for students regardless of whether they plan to enter college or the workforce following graduation.</p> <ul> <li><p><a href="http://www.isbe.state.il.us/career/pdf/CTE_fact_sheet.pdf" target="_blank">Career and Technical Education (Illinois Fact Sheet)</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="https://www.acteonline.org/cte/#.UnBduBCRJ2M" target="_blank">What is CTE? (Association for Career and Technical Education)</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://www.dropoutprevention.org/effective-strategies/career-and-technology-education-cte" target="_blank">Career and Technical Education (National Dropout Prevention Center/Network)</a></p></li> </ul> <p>This list shows Dual Enrollment courses that this school offers.</p> <p>Students interested in attending college can benefit from access to dual enrollment courses. Dual enrollment provides access to a wider range of rigorous courses, savings in time and money on a college degree, easier admission, and greater retention rates in college. Dual enrollment programs are particularly helpful for at-risk students, helping them transition to college following high school graduation.</p> <ul> <li><p><a href="http://nces.ed.gov/pubs2005/2005008.pdf" target="_blank">Dual Enrollment of High School Students at Post-Secondary Institutions 2002-03 (National Center for Education Statistics)</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://www.nacep.org/research-policy/research-studies/" target="_blank">Research Studies (National Alliance of Concurrent Enrollment Partnership)</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://www.ous.edu/sites/default/files/dept/ir/reports/dualcredit/DualCredit2010FINAL.pdf" target="_blank">Dual Credit in Oregon: An Analysis of Students Taking Dual Credit in High School in 2007-08 with Subsequent Performance in College (Office of Institutional Research – University of Oregon)</a></p></li> </ul> <p>This list shows Elective courses that this school offers.</p> <p>Students can cultivate interests, strengths, and special talents through elective courses. This allows students to explore an academic experience that is well rounded and targeted for college admissions that reach beyond the core requirements.</p> <ul> <li><p><a href="https://bigfuture.collegeboard.org/get-in/your-high-school-record/how-to-choose-high-school-electives" target="_blank">How to Choose High School Electives (College Board) </a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://www.greatschools.org/students/academic-skills/439-choosing-smart-electives.gs" target="_blank">Choosing Smart Electives (College Board)</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://www.publicschoolreview.com/articles/51" target="_blank">Decreasing Public High School Elective Programs(Public School Review)</a></p></li> </ul> <p>This list shows Health and Wellness Programs that this school offers.</p> <p>Schools offering programs to promote good health are preparing their students to live healthy lifestyles.</p> <ul> <li><p><a href="http://www.bridgingthegapresearch.org/_asset/13s2jm/WP_2013_report.pdf" target="_blank">School District Wellness Policies: Evaluating Progress and Potential for Improving Children’s Health (Bridging the Gap)</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://www.altfutures.com/pubs/DRA/Report_08_04_DRA_Project_School_Based_Wellness.pdf" target="_blank">School Based Wellness Programs: A Key Approach to Preventing Obesity and Reducing Health Disparities (Institute for Alternative Futures) </a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://www.rand.org/pubs/external_publications/EP20110010.html" target="_blank">Interventions to Improve Student Mental Health (RAND Corporation)</a></p></li> </ul> <p>This list shows selected awards that the school has won for academic success, athletic achievement, or accomplishments of faculty and students.</p> <p>Schools are often recognized for the accomplishments of their students and faculty by external organizations, partners, companies, and foundations. Examples include: Teacher of the Year, Librarian of the Year, awards related to school improvement, and grants from foundations, companies, or organizations.</p> <ul> <li><p><a href="http://www.bridgingthegapresearch.org/_asset/13s2jm/WP_2013_report.pdf" target="_blank">Bridging the Gap report</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://www.rand.org/pubs/external_publications/EP20110010.html" target="_blank">RAND article</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://www.rand.org/pubs/periodicals/health-quarterly/issues/v2/n4/04.html" target="_blank">RAND article</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://www.rand.org/pubs/external_publications/EP50371.html" target="_blank">RAND report</a></p></li> </ul> <p>This list includes Community Partnerships in which the school participates.</p> <p>Many schools have meaningful partnerships with local businesses and community organizations that serve to expand both academic and extracurricular offerings to students. Examples of these partnerships may include tutoring and mentoring programs, volunteer initiatives, and service learning opportunities.</p> <p>Schools with strong business and community partnerships may be able to provide opportunities for students that they otherwise would not have the resources to provide. </p> <p>These partnerships may provide students with opportunities to hone leadership skills, develop new talents, and practice skills.</p> <ul> <li><p><a href="http://www.ndpc-sd.org/documents/2012ITS/family_school_community_partnerships.pdf" target="_blank">What Research Says About Family-School-Community Partnershiips (National Center for School Engagement)</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://www.ecs.org/clearinghouse/44/03/4403.pdf" target="_blank">Building Community Through Service Learning: The Role of the Community Partner</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://smhp.psych.ucla.edu/qf/Commout_tt/School-Com2-8.pdf" target="_blank">School-Community Partnerships: A Guide (Center for Mental Health in Schools) </a></p></li> </ul> <p>This list includes Work Study programs in which the school participates.</p> <p>Students can gain hands-on work experience in high school through work study programs. These programs complement and strengthen students' academic learning.</p> <ul> <li><p><a href="http://www.nrccte.org/sites/default/files/publication-files/nrccte_work-based_learning.pdf" target="_blank">Work Based Learning Opportunities for High School Students (National Research Center for Career and Technical Education)</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://staff.washington.edu/sherylb/benefits_work_based.html" target="_blank">Perceived Benefits of Work-Based Learning: Differences between High School and Postsecondary Students with Disabilities (Journal of Inclusive Education)</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://opensiuc.lib.siu.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1060&amp;context=ojwed" target="_blank">School-to-Work Programs Effectiveness (Online Journal of Workforce Education and Development) </a></p></li> </ul> <p>This list shows the School Personnel Resources at this school.</p> <p>Non-faculty support positions are critical to ensuring that students are safe and supported academically and emotionally at school. Support resources are crucial to meeting students' needs in a school climate where teachers may not have sufficient time or training to address all that is required to ensure each student's success.</p> <ul> <li><p><a href="http://eric.ed.gov/?id=ED416568" target="_blank">Book</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://safesupportivelearning.ed.gov/training-technical-assistance/roles/school-support-staff" target="_blank">Department of Education page</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://eric.ed.gov/?id=ED331150" target="_blank">ERIC article</a></p></li> </ul> <p>This graph shows the average daily attendance at this school. By selecting "Add CMO Comparison", "Add District Comparison" or "Add State Comparison," you can compare the Student Attendance rate at this particular school to the CMO*, district, and state averages. </p> <p>*Charter Management Organization</p> <p>Regular attendance is critical in ensuring excellent student performance. Students who do not attend school regularly may fall behind in one or more subjects, and may struggle to complete assignments. </p> <ul> <li><p><a href="http://www.greatschools.org/parenting/behavior-discipline/644-school-attendance-issues.gs" target="_blank">School Attendance Issues to Consider (Great Schools Article)</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://www.nassp.org/tabid/3788/default.aspx?topic=A_Focus_on_Attendance_Is_Key_to_Success" target="_blank">A Focus on Attendance is Key to Success (National Association of Secondary School Principals)</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://www.every1graduates.org/wp-content/uploads/2012/05/FINALChronicAbsenteeismReport_May16.pdf" target="_blank">The Importance of Being in School (A Report on Absenteeism in the Nation’s Public Schools</a></p></li> </ul> <p>This graph shows the average daily attendance at this school. By selecting "Add District Comparison" or "Add State Comparison," you can compare the Student Attendance rate at this particular school to the district and state averages. </p> <p>Regular attendance is critical in ensuring excellent student performance. Students who do not attend school regularly may fall behind in one or more subjects, and may struggle to complete assignments. </p> <ul> <li><p><a href="http://www.greatschools.org/parenting/behavior-discipline/644-school-attendance-issues.gs" target="_blank">School Attendance Issues to Consider (Great Schools Article)</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://www.nassp.org/tabid/3788/default.aspx?topic=A_Focus_on_Attendance_Is_Key_to_Success" target="_blank">A Focus on Attendance is Key to Success (National Association of Secondary School Principals)</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://www.every1graduates.org/wp-content/uploads/2012/05/FINALChronicAbsenteeismReport_May16.pdf" target="_blank">The Importance of Being in School (A Report on Absenteeism in the Nation’s Public Schools</a></p></li> </ul> <p>This graph shows the average daily attendance at this school. By selecting "Add District Comparison" or "Add State Comparison," you can compare the Student Attendance rate at this particular school to the district and state averages. </p> <p>Regular attendance is critical in ensuring excellent student performance. Students who do not attend school regularly may fall behind in one or more subjects, and may struggle to complete assignments. </p> <ul> <li><p><a href="http://www.greatschools.org/parenting/behavior-discipline/644-school-attendance-issues.gs" target="_blank">School Attendance Issues to Consider (Great Schools Article)</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://www.nassp.org/tabid/3788/default.aspx?topic=A_Focus_on_Attendance_Is_Key_to_Success" target="_blank">A Focus on Attendance is Key to Success (National Association of Secondary School Principals)</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://www.every1graduates.org/wp-content/uploads/2012/05/FINALChronicAbsenteeismReport_May16.pdf" target="_blank">The Importance of Being in School (A Report on Absenteeism in the Nation’s Public Schools</a></p></li> </ul> <p>This graph shows the average daily attendance in this district. By selecting "Add State Comparison," you can compare the Student Attendance rate in this district to the state averages. </p> <p>Regular attendance is critical in ensuring excellent student performance. Students who do not attend school regularly may fall behind in one or more subjects, and may struggle to complete assignments. </p> <ul> <li><p><a href="http://www.greatschools.org/parenting/behavior-discipline/644-school-attendance-issues.gs" target="_blank">School Attendance Issues to Consider (Great Schools Article)</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://www.nassp.org/tabid/3788/default.aspx?topic=A_Focus_on_Attendance_Is_Key_to_Success" target="_blank">A Focus on Attendance is Key to Success (National Association of Secondary School Principals)</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://www.every1graduates.org/wp-content/uploads/2012/05/FINALChronicAbsenteeismReport_May16.pdf" target="_blank">The Importance of Being in School (A Report on Absenteeism in the Nation’s Public Schools</a></p></li> </ul> <p>This graph shows the average daily attendance in the state of Illinois. </p> <p>Regular attendance is critical in ensuring excellent student performance. Students who do not attend school regularly may fall behind in one or more subjects, and may struggle to complete assignments. </p> <ul> <li><p><a href="http://www.greatschools.org/parenting/behavior-discipline/644-school-attendance-issues.gs" target="_blank">School Attendance Issues to Consider (Great Schools Article)</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://www.nassp.org/tabid/3788/default.aspx?topic=A_Focus_on_Attendance_Is_Key_to_Success" target="_blank">A Focus on Attendance is Key to Success (National Association of Secondary School Principals)</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://www.every1graduates.org/wp-content/uploads/2012/05/FINALChronicAbsenteeismReport_May16.pdf" target="_blank">The Importance of Being in School (A Report on Absenteeism in the Nation’s Public Schools</a></p></li> </ul> <p>This graph shows the percentage of students who miss 5 percent or more of school days per year without a valid excuse. By selecting, “Show 5-year trend,” you can see changes in the student population over time. By selecting, "Add CMO Comparison", "Add District Comparison" or "Add State Comparison," you can compare the percentage of Chronically Truant Students at this particular school to the CMO*, district and state averages.</p> <p>*Charter Management Organization</p> <p>Illinois law defines “chronic truant” as a student who misses 5 percent of school days within an academic year without a valid excuse. That’s nine days of an average 180-day school year. The count of chronically truant students does not include students with excused absences, such as doctors’ appointments or students over the age of 16, who are not legally required to attend school. Chronic truants are at risk of academic and behavioral problems. Research shows that chronic truancy has been linked to serious delinquent activity in youth and to significant negative behavior and characteristics in adults.</p> <ul> <li><p><a href="http://whatworks.uwex.edu/attachment/whatworks_05.pdf‎" target="_blank">Finding effective solutions to truancy (University of Wisconsin – Madison)</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="https://www.ncjrs.gov/pdffiles1/ojjdp/188947.pdf" target="_blank">Truancy Reduction: Keeping Kids in School (Department of Justice)</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://www.ccyj.org/uploads/PPO/TRUANCY_Updated_July2012.pdf" target="_blank">Truancy Reduction: Research, Policy and Practice (Center for Children and Youth Justice)</a></p></li> </ul> <p>This graph shows the percentage of students who miss 5 percent or more of school days per year without a valid excuse. By selecting, “Show 5-year trend,” you can see changes in the student population over time. By selecting, "Add District Comparison" or "Add State Comparison," you can compare the percentage of Chronically Truant Students at this particular school to the district and state averages.</p> <p>Illinois law defines “chronic truant” as a student who misses 5 percent of school days within an academic year without a valid excuse. That’s nine days of an average 180-day school year. The count of chronically truant students does not include students with excused absences, such as doctors’ appointments or students over the age of 16, who are not legally required to attend school. Chronic truants are at risk of academic and behavioral problems. Research shows that chronic truancy has been linked to serious delinquent activity in youth and to significant negative behavior and characteristics in adults.</p> <ul> <li><p><a href="http://whatworks.uwex.edu/attachment/whatworks_05.pdf‎" target="_blank">Finding effective solutions to truancy (University of Wisconsin – Madison)</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="https://www.ncjrs.gov/pdffiles1/ojjdp/188947.pdf" target="_blank">Truancy Reduction: Keeping Kids in School (Department of Justice)</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://www.ccyj.org/uploads/PPO/TRUANCY_Updated_July2012.pdf" target="_blank">Truancy Reduction: Research, Policy and Practice (Center for Children and Youth Justice)</a></p></li> </ul> <p>This graph shows the percentage of students who miss 5 percent or more of school days per year without a valid excuse. By selecting, “Show 5-year trend,” you can see changes in the student population over time. By selecting, "Add District Comparison" or "Add State Comparison," you can compare the percentage of Chronically Truant Students at this particular school to the district and state averages.</p> <p>Illinois law defines “chronic truant” as a student who misses 5 percent of school days within an academic year without a valid excuse. That’s nine days of an average 180-day school year. The count of chronically truant students does not include students with excused absences, such as doctors’ appointments or students over the age of 16, who are not legally required to attend school. Chronic truants are at risk of academic and behavioral problems. Research shows that chronic truancy has been linked to serious delinquent activity in youth and to significant negative behavior and characteristics in adults.</p> <ul> <li><p><a href="http://whatworks.uwex.edu/attachment/whatworks_05.pdf‎" target="_blank">Finding effective solutions to truancy (University of Wisconsin – Madison)</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="https://www.ncjrs.gov/pdffiles1/ojjdp/188947.pdf" target="_blank">Truancy Reduction: Keeping Kids in School (Department of Justice)</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://www.ccyj.org/uploads/PPO/TRUANCY_Updated_July2012.pdf" target="_blank">Truancy Reduction: Research, Policy and Practice (Center for Children and Youth Justice)</a></p></li> </ul> <p>This graph shows the percentage of students who miss 5 percent or more of school days per year without a valid excuse. By selecting, “Show 5-year trend,” you can see changes in the student population over time. By selecting, "Add State Comparison," you can compare the percentage of Chronically Truant Students in this district to the state average.</p> <p>Illinois law defines “chronic truant” as a student who misses 5 percent of school days within an academic year without a valid excuse. That’s nine days of an average 180-day school year. The count of chronically truant students does not include students with excused absences, such as doctors’ appointments or students over the age of 16, who are not legally required to attend school. Chronic truants are at risk of academic and behavioral problems. Research shows that chronic truancy has been linked to serious delinquent activity in youth and to significant negative behavior and characteristics in adults.</p> <ul> <li><p><a href="http://whatworks.uwex.edu/attachment/whatworks_05.pdf‎" target="_blank">Finding effective solutions to truancy (University of Wisconsin – Madison)</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="https://www.ncjrs.gov/pdffiles1/ojjdp/188947.pdf" target="_blank">Truancy Reduction: Keeping Kids in School (Department of Justice)</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://www.ccyj.org/uploads/PPO/TRUANCY_Updated_July2012.pdf" target="_blank">Truancy Reduction: Research, Policy and Practice (Center for Children and Youth Justice)</a></p></li> </ul> <p>This graph shows the percentage of students who miss 5 percent or more of school days per year without a valid excuse. By selecting, “Show 5-year trend,” you can see changes in the student population over time.</p> <p>Illinois law defines “chronic truant” as a student who misses 5 percent of school days within an academic year without a valid excuse. That’s nine days of an average 180-day school year. The count of chronically truant students does not include students with excused absences, such as doctors’ appointments or students over the age of 16, who are not legally required to attend school. Chronic truants are at risk of academic and behavioral problems. Research shows that chronic truancy has been linked to serious delinquent activity in youth and to significant negative behavior and characteristics in adults.</p> <ul> <li><p><a href="http://whatworks.uwex.edu/attachment/whatworks_05.pdf‎" target="_blank">Finding effective solutions to truancy (University of Wisconsin – Madison)</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="https://www.ncjrs.gov/pdffiles1/ojjdp/188947.pdf" target="_blank">Truancy Reduction: Keeping Kids in School (Department of Justice)</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://www.ccyj.org/uploads/PPO/TRUANCY_Updated_July2012.pdf" target="_blank">Truancy Reduction: Research, Policy and Practice (Center for Children and Youth Justice)</a></p></li> </ul> <p>This graph shows the total number of days in which the school provided at least 5 hours of instruction in the 2012-2013 school year. By selecting "Add CMO Comparison", "Add District Comparison" or "Add State Comparison," you can compare the Total School Days at this particular school to the CMO*, district, and state averages.</p> <p>*Charter Management Organization</p> <p>The minimum legal length for an Illinois public school's year is 176 days. The number of actual calendar days varies from district to district. Districts, CMOs, or charter schools that increase total school days have more time to improve students' learning experience inside and/or outside their academic interests. The effect of a longer school year depends on how a school utilizes the additional time.</p> <ul> <li><p><a href="http://educationnext.org/time-for-school/" target="_blank">Time for School? (Education Next)</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://www.edweek.org/ew/issues/year-round-schooling/" target="_blank">Year Round Schooling (Education Week)</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED461695.pdf" target="_blank">Extended School Day/Year Programs (Mid-Atlantic Lab)</a></p></li> </ul> <p>This graph shows the total number of days in which the school provided at least 5 hours of instruction in the 2012-2013 school year. By selecting "Add District Comparison" or "Add State Comparison," you can compare the Total School Days at this particular school to the district and state averages.</p> <p>The minimum legal length for an Illinois public school's year is 176 days. The number of actual calendar days varies from district to district. Districts that increase total school days have more time to improve students' learning experience inside and/or outside their academic interests. The effect of a longer school year depends on how a school utilizes the additional time.</p> <ul> <li><p><a href="http://educationnext.org/time-for-school/" target="_blank">Time for School? (Education Next)</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://www.edweek.org/ew/issues/year-round-schooling/" target="_blank">Year Round Schooling (Education Week)</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED461695.pdf" target="_blank">Extended School Day/Year Programs (Mid-Atlantic Lab)</a></p></li> </ul> <p>This graph shows the total number of days in which the school provided at least 5 hours of instruction in the 2012-2013 school year. By selecting "Add District Comparison" or "Add State Comparison," you can compare the Total School Days at this particular school to the district and state averages.</p> <p>The minimum legal length for an Illinois public school's year is 176 days. The number of actual calendar days varies from district to district. Districts that increase total school days have more time to improve students' learning experience inside and/or outside their academic interests. The effect of a longer school year depends on how a school utilizes the additional time.</p> <ul> <li><p><a href="http://educationnext.org/time-for-school/" target="_blank">Time for School? (Education Next)</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://www.edweek.org/ew/issues/year-round-schooling/" target="_blank">Year Round Schooling (Education Week)</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED461695.pdf" target="_blank">Extended School Day/Year Programs (Mid-Atlantic Lab)</a></p></li> </ul> <p>This graph shows the total number of days in which this district provided at least 5 hours of instruction in the 2012-2013 school year.. By selecting "Add State Comparison," you can compare the Total School Days in this district to the state average.</p> <p>The minimum legal length for an Illinois public school's year is 176 days. The number of actual calendar days varies from district to district. Districts that increase total school days have more time to improve students' learning experience inside and/or outside their academic interests. The effect of a longer school year depends on how a school utilizes the additional time.</p> <ul> <li><p><a href="http://educationnext.org/time-for-school/" target="_blank">Time for School? (Education Next)</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://www.edweek.org/ew/issues/year-round-schooling/" target="_blank">Year Round Schooling (Education Week)</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED461695.pdf" target="_blank">Extended School Day/Year Programs (Mid-Atlantic Lab)</a></p></li> </ul> <p>This graph shows the total number of days in which districts in Illinois provided at least 5 hours of instruction in the 2012-2013 school year.</p> <p>The minimum legal length for an Illinois public school's year is 176 days. The number of actual calendar days varies from district to district. Districts that increase total school days have more time to improve students' learning experience inside and/or outside their academic interests. The effect of a longer school year depends on how a school utilizes the additional time.</p> <ul> <li><p><a href="http://educationnext.org/time-for-school/" target="_blank">Time for School? (Education Next)</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://www.edweek.org/ew/issues/year-round-schooling/" target="_blank">Year Round Schooling (Education Week)</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED461695.pdf" target="_blank">Extended School Day/Year Programs (Mid-Atlantic Lab)</a></p></li> </ul> <p>This graph shows the average minutes per week spent on each subject area. By selecting "Add District Comparison" or "Add State Comparison," you can compare the minutes per subject at this particular school to the district and state averages.</p> <p>It is critical in both elementary and middle school that students are provided adequate opportunities to learn Mathematics, Science, English and Social Studies. While teachers and schools may dedicate more time to certain subjects over others, all subjects should be represented in each grade's curriculum, so that students are consistently developing skills in all four areas.</p> <ul> <li><p><a href="http://www.isbe.net/news/pdf/grad_require.pdf" target="_blank">ISBE guidance document</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://0-nces.ed.gov.opac.acc.msmc.edu/pubs/97293.pdf" target="_blank">NCES report</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://www.centerforpubliceducation.org/Main-Menu/Organizing-a-school/Copy-of-Making-time-At-a-glance" target="_blank">Center for Public Education article</a></p></li> </ul> <p>These graphs show the percentage of students who graduated from high school this year within 4 and 5 years of beginning 9th grade. </p> <p>The 5-year graduation rate is a new metric that was not measured prior the 2012 school year.</p> <p>By selecting "Add CMO Comparison", "Add District Comparison" or "Add State Comparison," you can compare the Graduation Rate at this school to the district and state averages.</p> <p>*Charter Management Organization</p> <p>A high school diploma is vital both for students who plan to enter college and students who plan to enter the workforce. </p> <p>The 5-year graduation rate illustrates completion of high school by students who require up to one additional year of instruction. </p> <p>In order to ensure that graduates are ready for college and career, it is important to evaluate graduation rate in the context of student achievement, college-readiness, and career-readiness.</p> <ul> <li><p><a href="http://www.pbs.org/newshour/rundown/2013/02/new-report-highlights-us-graduation-gains.html" target="_blank">New Report Highlights U.S. Graduation Gains, Decline in 'Dropout Factories' (PBS) </a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://ccsr.uchicago.edu/sites/default/files/publications/07%20What%20Matters%20Final.pdf" target="_blank">What Matters for Staying on Track and Graduating in Chicago Public High Schools (Consortium on Chicago Schools Research)</a></p></li> </ul> <p>These graphs show the percentage of students who graduated from high school this year within 4 and 5 years of beginning 9th grade. </p> <p>The 5-year graduation rate is a new metric that was not measured prior the 2012 school year.</p> <p>By selecting "Add District Comparison" or "Add State Comparison," you can compare the Graduation Rate at this school to the district and state averages.</p> <p>A high school diploma is vital both for students who plan to enter college and students who plan to enter the workforce. </p> <p>The 5-year graduation rate illustrates completion of high school by students who require up to one additional year of instruction. </p> <p>In order to ensure that graduates are ready for college and career, it is important to evaluate graduation rate in the context of student achievement, college-readiness, and career-readiness.</p> <ul> <li><p><a href="http://www.pbs.org/newshour/rundown/2013/02/new-report-highlights-us-graduation-gains.html" target="_blank">New Report Highlights U.S. Graduation Gains, Decline in 'Dropout Factories' (PBS) </a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://ccsr.uchicago.edu/sites/default/files/publications/07%20What%20Matters%20Final.pdf" target="_blank">What Matters for Staying on Track and Graduating in Chicago Public High Schools (Consortium on Chicago Schools Research)</a></p></li> </ul> <p>These graphs show the percentage of students who graduated from high school this year within 4 and 5 years of beginning 9th grade. </p> <p>The 5-year graduation rate is a new metric that was not measured prior the 2012 school year.</p> <p>By selecting "Add District Comparison" or "Add State Comparison," you can compare the Graduation Rate at this school to the district and state averages.</p> <p>A high school diploma is vital both for students who plan to enter college and students who plan to enter the workforce. </p> <p>The 5-year graduation rate illustrates completion of high school by students who require up to one additional year of instruction. </p> <p>In order to ensure that graduates are ready for college and career, it is important to evaluate graduation rate in the context of student achievement, college-readiness, and career-readiness.</p> <ul> <li><p><a href="http://www.pbs.org/newshour/rundown/2013/02/new-report-highlights-us-graduation-gains.html" target="_blank">New Report Highlights U.S. Graduation Gains, Decline in 'Dropout Factories' (PBS) </a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://ccsr.uchicago.edu/sites/default/files/publications/07%20What%20Matters%20Final.pdf" target="_blank">What Matters for Staying on Track and Graduating in Chicago Public High Schools (Consortium on Chicago Schools Research)</a></p></li> </ul> <p>These graphs show the percentage of students who graduated from high school this year within 4 and 5 years of beginning 9th grade. </p> <p>The 5-year graduation rate is a new metric that was not measured prior the 2012 school year.</p> <p>By selecting "Add State Comparison," you can compare the Graduation Rate at this district to the state average.</p> <p>A high school diploma is vital both for students who plan to enter college and students who plan to enter the workforce. </p> <p>The 5-year graduation rate illustrates completion of high school by students who require up to one additional year of instruction. </p> <p>In order to ensure that graduates are ready for college and career, it is important to evaluate graduation rate in the context of student achievement, college-readiness, and career-readiness.</p> <ul> <li><p><a href="http://www.pbs.org/newshour/rundown/2013/02/new-report-highlights-us-graduation-gains.html" target="_blank">New Report Highlights U.S. Graduation Gains, Decline in 'Dropout Factories' (PBS) </a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://ccsr.uchicago.edu/sites/default/files/publications/07%20What%20Matters%20Final.pdf" target="_blank">What Matters for Staying on Track and Graduating in Chicago Public High Schools (Consortium on Chicago Schools Research)</a></p></li> </ul> <p>These graphs show the percentage of students who graduated from high school this year within 4 and 5 years of beginning 9th grade. </p> <p>The 5-year graduation rate is a new metric that was not measured prior the 2012 school year.</p> <p>A high school diploma is vital both for students who plan to enter college and students who plan to enter the workforce. </p> <p>The 5-year graduation rate illustrates completion of high school by students who require up to one additional year of instruction. </p> <p>In order to ensure that graduates are ready for college and career, it is important to evaluate graduation rate in the context of student achievement, college-readiness, and career-readiness.</p> <ul> <li><p><a href="http://www.pbs.org/newshour/rundown/2013/02/new-report-highlights-us-graduation-gains.html" target="_blank">New Report Highlights U.S. Graduation Gains, Decline in 'Dropout Factories' (PBS) </a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://ccsr.uchicago.edu/sites/default/files/publications/07%20What%20Matters%20Final.pdf" target="_blank">What Matters for Staying on Track and Graduating in Chicago Public High Schools (Consortium on Chicago Schools Research)</a></p></li> </ul> <p>This graph shows the percentage of students at this school who do not have permanent or adequate homes. By selecting "Add CMO Comparison", "Add District Comparison" or "Add State Comparison," you can compare the percentage of homeless students at this particular school to the CMO*, district, and state averages.</p> <p>*Charter Management Organization</p> <p>Federal and state laws require school districts to provide additional help and support for homeless students. Services may include education, transportation, and healthcare, as well as removing barriers to school attendance. The district is responsible for actively reaching out to homeless students and families to make sure that they have the support that they need. </p> <p>Homeless students may include those who are sharing housing with other individuals due to loss of housing, living in non-housing locations, living in emergency or transitional shelters, or awaiting foster care placement.</p> <ul> <li><p><a href="http://www.isbe.state.il.us/homeless/" target="_blank">Homeless Education (Illinois State Board of Education)</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://www.suntimes.com/9818290-417/numbing-numbers.html" target="_blank">Number of Homeless Students Surging, Putting Strain on Schools (Chicago Sun-Times)</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://www.scholastic.com/browse/article.jsp?id=3756883" target="_blank">One Million Students Homeless (Scholastic)</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://www.sde.ct.gov/sde/lib/sde/PDF/DEPS/Homeless/Factsheets/IdentifyingStudents.pdf" target="_blank">Identifying Students in Homeless Situations (National Center for Homeless Education)</a></p></li> </ul> <p>This graph shows the percentage of students at this school who do not have permanent or adequate homes. By selecting "Add District Comparison" or "Add State Comparison," you can compare the percentage of homeless students at this particular school to the district and state averages.</p> <p>Federal and state laws require school districts to provide additional help and support for homeless students. Services may include education, transportation, and healthcare, as well as removing barriers to school attendance. The district is responsible for actively reaching out to homeless students and families to make sure that they have the support that they need. </p> <p>Homeless students may include those who are sharing housing with other individuals due to loss of housing, living in non-housing locations, living in emergency or transitional shelters, or awaiting foster care placement.</p> <ul> <li><p><a href="http://www.isbe.state.il.us/homeless/" target="_blank">Homeless Education (Illinois State Board of Education)</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://www.suntimes.com/9818290-417/numbing-numbers.html" target="_blank">Number of Homeless Students Surging, Putting Strain on Schools (Chicago Sun-Times)</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://www.scholastic.com/browse/article.jsp?id=3756883" target="_blank">One Million Students Homeless (Scholastic)</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://www.sde.ct.gov/sde/lib/sde/PDF/DEPS/Homeless/Factsheets/IdentifyingStudents.pdf" target="_blank">Identifying Students in Homeless Situations (National Center for Homeless Education)</a></p></li> </ul> <p>This graph shows the percentage of students at this school who do not have permanent or adequate homes. By selecting "Add District Comparison" or "Add State Comparison," you can compare the percentage of homeless students at this particular school to the district and state averages.</p> <p>Federal and state laws require school districts to provide additional help and support for homeless students. Services may include education, transportation, and healthcare, as well as removing barriers to school attendance. The district is responsible for actively reaching out to homeless students and families to make sure that they have the support that they need. </p> <p>Homeless students may include those who are sharing housing with other individuals due to loss of housing, living in non-housing locations, living in emergency or transitional shelters, or awaiting foster care placement.</p> <ul> <li><p><a href="http://www.isbe.state.il.us/homeless/" target="_blank">Homeless Education (Illinois State Board of Education)</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://www.suntimes.com/9818290-417/numbing-numbers.html" target="_blank">Number of Homeless Students Surging, Putting Strain on Schools (Chicago Sun-Times)</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://www.scholastic.com/browse/article.jsp?id=3756883" target="_blank">One Million Students Homeless (Scholastic)</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://www.sde.ct.gov/sde/lib/sde/PDF/DEPS/Homeless/Factsheets/IdentifyingStudents.pdf" target="_blank">Identifying Students in Homeless Situations (National Center for Homeless Education)</a></p></li> </ul> <p>This graph shows the percentage of students in this district who do not have permanent or adequate homes. By selecting "Add State Comparison," you can compare the percentage of homeless students in this district to the state average.</p> <p>Federal and state laws require school districts to provide additional help and support for homeless students. Services may include education, transportation, and healthcare, as well as removing barriers to school attendance. The district is responsible for actively reaching out to homeless students and families to make sure that they have the support that they need. </p> <p>Homeless students may include those who are sharing housing with other individuals due to loss of housing, living in non-housing locations, living in emergency or transitional shelters, or awaiting foster care placement.</p> <ul> <li><p><a href="http://www.isbe.state.il.us/homeless/" target="_blank">Homeless Education (Illinois State Board of Education)</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://www.suntimes.com/9818290-417/numbing-numbers.html" target="_blank">Number of Homeless Students Surging, Putting Strain on Schools (Chicago Sun-Times)</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://www.scholastic.com/browse/article.jsp?id=3756883" target="_blank">One Million Students Homeless (Scholastic)</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://www.sde.ct.gov/sde/lib/sde/PDF/DEPS/Homeless/Factsheets/IdentifyingStudents.pdf" target="_blank">Identifying Students in Homeless Situations (National Center for Homeless Education)</a></p></li> </ul> <p>This graph shows the percentage of students in Illinois schools who do not have permanent or adequate homes.</p> <p>Federal and state laws require school districts to provide additional help and support for homeless students. Services may include education, transportation, and healthcare, as well as removing barriers to school attendance. The state is responsible for actively reaching out to homeless students and families to make sure that they have the support that they need. </p> <p>Homeless students may include those who are sharing housing with other individuals due to loss of housing, living in non-housing locations, living in emergency or transitional shelters, or awaiting foster care placement.</p> <ul> <li><p><a href="http://www.isbe.state.il.us/homeless/" target="_blank">Homeless Education (Illinois State Board of Education)</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://www.suntimes.com/9818290-417/numbing-numbers.html" target="_blank">Number of Homeless Students Surging, Putting Strain on Schools (Chicago Sun-Times)</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://www.scholastic.com/browse/article.jsp?id=3756883" target="_blank">One Million Students Homeless (Scholastic)</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://www.sde.ct.gov/sde/lib/sde/PDF/DEPS/Homeless/Factsheets/IdentifyingStudents.pdf" target="_blank">Identifying Students in Homeless Situations (National Center for Homeless Education)</a></p></li> </ul> <div class="view view1"> <div style="text-align:center;"> <h5> Video Overview </h5> <iframe src="//player.vimeo.com/video/77713067" class="iframe-video iframe-explanation-video" style="width: 480px; height: 360px;"> </iframe> </div> <p>Student Academic Growth is a measurement of students advancing from one performance level on the ISAT to another performance level (or “growing”) from one year to the next. Unlike test scores, which only show a one-time snapshot of students’ achievement, Student Academic Growth compares students’ achievement from one year to the next to measure improvements over time.</p> <p>This bar graph shows the average academic growth in Reading and Mathematics by students in this school, Charter Management Organization (CMO), district, and the state. The measure is computed for all students based on their performance on state tests and represents the average growth that students are making each year. This growth measure is expressed as a number between 0 and 200 where a value above 100 represents positive growth and/or consistently high achievement, and a value below 100 represents negative growth and/or consistently low achievement.</p> <p>Click on “View Details” to see the value table which provides the basis for calculating annual academic growth in this school.</p> </div> <div class="view view2"> <p>Refer to information above the graphs.</p> </div> <div class="view view3"> <p>Refer to information above the graphs.</p> </div> <div class="view view1"> <p>Using growth measures, in addition to standardized test scores, offers a more complete approach to understanding student performance than relying on test scores alone. Since the use of “Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP)”as defined under No Child Left Behind (NCLB) only reflects how schools, CMOs and districts perform at one point in time, the Illinois State Board of Education (ISBE) has decided to introduce a growth measure to the school accountability framework.</p> <p>To measure student achievement growth for schools, CMOs and districts, Illinois uses a value table model. Student growth is determined by the performance of the students within a school, CMO, or district from one year to the next year. The amount of growth is then assigned a set value based on the value table. (For the explanation of how growth values are assigned, see the section on “Calculating the Student Academic Growth Value” by clicking View Details).</p> <p>All of the students’ scores in a given school are added together and divided by the total number of students in the school to obtain an average growth metric. The same process applies to the CMO or district growth metric with all of the students’ scores for the CMO or district averaged to obtain the growth metric.</p> <p>For more information about the Value Table Model click on <a href="http://www.isbe.state.il.us/GMWG/pdf/gmvt-fact-sheet-0813.pdf" target="_blank">http://www.isbe.state.il.us/GMWG/pdf/gmvt-fact-sheet-0813.pdf</a> </p> </div> <div class="view view2"> <p>Refer to information above the graphs.</p> </div> <div class="view view3"> <p>Refer to information above the graphs.</p> </div> <ul> <li><p><a href="http://www.isbe.state.il.us/GMWG/pdf/gmvt-fact-sheet-0813.pdf" target="_blank">New Growth Model Using Value Tables (Illinois State Board of Education)</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://www.isbe.state.il.us/GMWG/pdf/gmvt-faqs-0813.pdf" target="_blank">Frequently Asked Questions - Value Table Growth Model (Illinois State Board of Education)</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://www.nea.org/assets/docs/HE/PB10a_GrowthModels.pdf" target="_blank">Growth Models – An Update on the Effectiveness of Determining Student Progress and School Accountability (National Education Association)</a></p></li> </ul> <div class="view view1"> <div style="text-align:center;"> <h5> Video Overview </h5> <iframe src="//player.vimeo.com/video/77713067" class="iframe-video iframe-explanation-video" style="width: 480px; height: 360px;"> </iframe> </div> <p>Student Academic Growth is a measurement of students advancing from one performance level on the ISAT to another performance level (or “growing”) from one year to the next. Unlike test scores, which only show a one-time snapshot of students’ achievement, Student Academic Growth compares students’ achievement from one year to the next to measure improvements over time.</p> <p>This bar graph shows the average academic growth in Reading and Mathematics by students in this school, the district, and the state. The measure is computed for all students based on their performance on state tests and represents the average growth that students are making each year. This growth measure is expressed as a number between 0 and 200 where a value above 100 represents positive growth and/or consistently high achievement, and a value below 100 represents negative growth and/or consistently low achievement.</p> <p>Click on “View Details” to see the value table which provides the basis for calculating annual academic growth in this school.</p> </div> <div class="view view2"> <p>Refer to information above the graphs.</p> </div> <div class="view view3"> <p>Refer to information above the graphs.</p> </div> <div class="view view1"> <p>Using growth measures, in addition to standardized test scores, offers a more complete approach to understanding student performance than relying on test scores alone. Since the use of “Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP)”as defined under No Child Left Behind (NCLB) only reflects how schools and districts perform at one point in time, the Illinois State Board of Education (ISBE) has decided to introduce a growth measure to the school accountability framework.</p> <p>To measure student achievement growth for schools and districts, Illinois uses a value table model. Student growth is determined by the performance of the students within a school or district from one year to the next year. The amount of growth is then assigned a set value based on the value table. (For the explanation of how growth values are assigned, see the section on “Calculating the Student Academic Growth Value” by clicking View Details).</p> <p>All of the students’ scores in a given school are added together and divided by the total number of students in the school to obtain an average growth metric. The same process applies to the district growth metric with all of the students’ scores for the district averaged to obtain the growth metric.</p> <p>For more information about the Value Table Model click on <a href="http://www.isbe.state.il.us/GMWG/pdf/gmvt-fact-sheet-0813.pdf" target="_blank">http://www.isbe.state.il.us/GMWG/pdf/gmvt-fact-sheet-0813.pdf</a> </p> </div> <div class="view view2"> <p>Refer to information above the graphs.</p> </div> <div class="view view3"> <p>Refer to information above the graphs.</p> </div> <ul> <li><p><a href="http://www.isbe.state.il.us/GMWG/pdf/gmvt-fact-sheet-0813.pdf" target="_blank">New Growth Model Using Value Tables (Illinois State Board of Education)</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://www.isbe.state.il.us/GMWG/pdf/gmvt-faqs-0813.pdf" target="_blank">Frequently Asked Questions - Value Table Growth Model (Illinois State Board of Education)</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://www.nea.org/assets/docs/HE/PB10a_GrowthModels.pdf" target="_blank">Growth Models – An Update on the Effectiveness of Determining Student Progress and School Accountability (National Education Association)</a></p></li> </ul> <div class="view view1"> <div style="text-align:center;"> <h5> Video Overview </h5> <iframe src="//player.vimeo.com/video/77713067" class="iframe-video iframe-explanation-video" style="width: 480px; height: 360px;"> </iframe> </div> <p>Student Academic Growth is a measurement of students advancing from one performance level on the ISAT to another performance level (or “growing”) from one year to the next. Unlike test scores, which only show a one-time snapshot of students’ achievement, Student Academic Growth compares students’ achievement from one year to the next to measure improvements over time.</p> <p>This bar graph shows the average academic growth in Reading and Mathematics by students in this school, the district, and the state. The measure is computed for all students based on their performance on state tests and represents the average growth that students are making each year. This growth measure is expressed as a number between 0 and 200 where a value above 100 represents positive growth and/or consistently high achievement, and a value below 100 represents negative growth and/or consistently low achievement.</p> <p>Click on “View Details” to see the value table which provides the basis for calculating annual academic growth in this school.</p> </div> <div class="view view2"> <p>Refer to information above the graphs.</p> </div> <div class="view view3"> <p>Refer to information above the graphs.</p> </div> <div class="view view1"> <p>Using growth measures, in addition to standardized test scores, offers a more complete approach to understanding student performance than relying on test scores alone. Since the use of “Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP)”as defined under No Child Left Behind (NCLB) only reflects how schools and districts perform at one point in time, the Illinois State Board of Education (ISBE) has decided to introduce a growth measure to the school accountability framework.</p> <p>To measure student achievement growth for schools and districts, Illinois uses a value table model. Student growth is determined by the performance of the students within a school or district from one year to the next year. The amount of growth is then assigned a set value based on the value table. (For the explanation of how growth values are assigned, see the section on “Calculating the Student Academic Growth Value” by clicking View Details).</p> <p>All of the students’ scores in a given school are added together and divided by the total number of students in the school to obtain an average growth metric. The same process applies to the district growth metric with all of the students’ scores for the district averaged to obtain the growth metric.</p> <p>For more information about the Value Table Model click on <a href="http://www.isbe.state.il.us/GMWG/pdf/gmvt-fact-sheet-0813.pdf" target="_blank">http://www.isbe.state.il.us/GMWG/pdf/gmvt-fact-sheet-0813.pdf</a> </p> </div> <div class="view view2"> <p>Refer to information above the graphs.</p> </div> <div class="view view3"> <p>Refer to information above the graphs.</p> </div> <ul> <li><p><a href="http://www.isbe.state.il.us/GMWG/pdf/gmvt-fact-sheet-0813.pdf" target="_blank">New Growth Model Using Value Tables (Illinois State Board of Education)</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://www.isbe.state.il.us/GMWG/pdf/gmvt-faqs-0813.pdf" target="_blank">Frequently Asked Questions - Value Table Growth Model (Illinois State Board of Education)</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://www.nea.org/assets/docs/HE/PB10a_GrowthModels.pdf" target="_blank">Growth Models – An Update on the Effectiveness of Determining Student Progress and School Accountability (National Education Association)</a></p></li> </ul> <div class="view view1"> <div style="text-align:center;"> <h5> Video Overview </h5> <iframe src="//player.vimeo.com/video/77713067" class="iframe-video iframe-explanation-video" style="width: 480px; height: 360px;"> </iframe> </div> <p>Student Academic Growth is a measurement of students advancing from one performance level on the ISAT to another performance level (or “growing”) from one year to the next. Unlike test scores, which only show a one-time snapshot of students’ achievement, Student Academic Growth compares students’ achievement from one year to the next to measure improvements over time.</p> <p>This bar graph shows the average academic growth in Reading and Mathematics, by students in the district and the state. The measure is computed for all students based on their performance on state tests and represents the average growth that students are making each year. This growth measure is expressed as a number between 0 and 200 where a value above 100 represents positive growth and/or consistently high achievement, and a value below 100 represents negative growth and/or consistently low achievement.</p> <p>Click on “View Details” to see the value table which provides the basis for calculating annual academic growth in this district.</p> </div> <div class="view view2"> <p>Refer to information above the graphs.</p> </div> <div class="view view3"> <p>Refer to information above the graphs.</p> </div> <div class="view view1"> <p>Using growth measures, in addition to standardized test scores, offers a more complete approach to understanding student performance than relying on test scores alone. Since the use of “Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP)”as defined under No Child Left Behind (NCLB) only reflects how schools and districts perform at one point in time, the Illinois State Board of Education (ISBE) has decided to introduce a growth measure to the school accountability framework.</p> <p>To measure student achievement growth for schools and districts, Illinois uses a value table model. Student growth is determined by the performance of the students within a school or district from one year to the next year. The amount of growth is then assigned a set value based on the value table. (For the explanation of how growth values are assigned, see the section on “Calculating the Student Academic Growth Value” by clicking View Details).</p> <p>All of the students’ scores in a given school are added together and divided by the total number of students in the school to obtain an average growth metric. The same process applies to the district growth metric with all of the students’ scores for the district averaged to obtain the growth metric.</p> <p>For more information about the Value Table Model click on <a href="http://www.isbe.state.il.us/GMWG/pdf/gmvt-fact-sheet-0813.pdf" target="_blank">http://www.isbe.state.il.us/GMWG/pdf/gmvt-fact-sheet-0813.pdf</a> </p> </div> <div class="view view2"> <p>Refer to information above the graphs.</p> </div> <div class="view view3"> <p>Refer to information above the graphs.</p> </div> <ul> <li><p><a href="http://www.isbe.state.il.us/GMWG/pdf/gmvt-fact-sheet-0813.pdf" target="_blank">New Growth Model Using Value Tables (Illinois State Board of Education)</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://www.isbe.state.il.us/GMWG/pdf/gmvt-faqs-0813.pdf" target="_blank">Frequently Asked Questions - Value Table Growth Model (Illinois State Board of Education)</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://www.nea.org/assets/docs/HE/PB10a_GrowthModels.pdf" target="_blank">Growth Models – An Update on the Effectiveness of Determining Student Progress and School Accountability (National Education Association)</a></p></li> </ul> <div class="view view1"> <div style="text-align:center;"> <h5> Video Overview </h5> <iframe src="//player.vimeo.com/video/77713067" class="iframe-video iframe-explanation-video" style="width: 480px; height: 360px;"> </iframe> </div> <p>Student Academic Growth is a measurement of students advancing from one performance level on the ISAT to another performance level (or “growing”) from one year to the next. Unlike test scores, which only show a one-time snapshot of students’ achievement, Student Academic Growth compares students’ achievement from one year to the next to measure improvements over time.</p> <p>This bar graph shows the average academic growth in Reading and Mathematics, by students in Illinois. The measure is computed for all students based on their performance on state tests and represents the average growth that students are making each year. This growth measure is expressed as a number between 0 and 200 where a value above 100 represents positive growth and/or consistently high achievement, and a value below 100 represents negative growth and/or consistently low achievement.</p> <p>Click on “View Details” to see the value table which provides the basis for calculating annual academic growth in Illinois.</p> </div> <div class="view view2"> <p>Refer to information above the graphs.</p> </div> <div class="view view3"> <p>Refer to information above the graphs.</p> </div> <div class="view view1"> <p>Using growth measures, in addition to standardized test scores, offers a more complete approach to understanding student performance than relying on test scores alone. Since the use of “Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP)”as defined under No Child Left Behind (NCLB) only reflects how schools and districts perform at one point in time, the Illinois State Board of Education (ISBE) has decided to introduce a growth measure to the school accountability framework.</p> <p>To measure student achievement growth for schools and districts, Illinois uses a value table model. Student growth is determined by the performance of the students within a school or district from one year to the next year. The amount of growth is then assigned a set value based on the value table. (For the explanation of how growth values are assigned, see the section on “Calculating the Student Academic Growth Value” by clicking View Details).</p> <p>All of the students’ scores in a given school are added together and divided by the total number of students in the school to obtain an average growth metric. The same process applies to the district growth metric with all of the students’ scores for the district averaged to obtain the growth metric.</p> <p>For more information about the Value Table Model click on <a href="http://www.isbe.state.il.us/GMWG/pdf/gmvt-fact-sheet-0813.pdf">http://www.isbe.state.il.us/GMWG/pdf/gmvt-fact-sheet-0813.pdf</a> </p> </div> <div class="view view2"> <p>Refer to information above the graphs.</p> </div> <div class="view view3"> <p>Refer to information above the graphs.</p> </div> <ul> <li><p><a href="http://www.isbe.state.il.us/GMWG/pdf/gmvt-fact-sheet-0813.pdf" target="_blank">New Growth Model Using Value Tables (Illinois State Board of Education)</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://www.isbe.state.il.us/GMWG/pdf/gmvt-faqs-0813.pdf" target="_blank">Frequently Asked Questions - Value Table Growth Model (Illinois State Board of Education)</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://www.nea.org/assets/docs/HE/PB10a_GrowthModels.pdf" target="_blank">Growth Models – An Update on the Effectiveness of Determining Student Progress and School Accountability (National Education Association)</a></p></li> </ul> <p>This list shows athletic programs offered, including sports sanctioned by the Illinois High School Athletic Association and other recreational opportunities.</p> <p>Research has demonstrated a strong and positive correlation between athletic participation and academic achievement. School sports help to build well rounded students, often giving them leadership opportunities. Students also learn the important skills needed to work in a group setting.</p> <ul> <li><p><a href="http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2010/02/15/as-girls-become-women-sports-pay-dividends/?_r=0" target="_blank">As Girls Become Women, Sports Pay Dividends (New York Times Blog)</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://library.la84.org/3ce/HighSchoolSportsParticipation.pdf" target="_blank">High School Sports Participation and Attainment: Recognizing, Assessing, and Utilizing the Relationship (LA84 Foundation)</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://www.eeraonline.org/journal/files/v22/JRE_v22n2_Article_1_Bowen.pdf" target="_blank">Does Athletic Success Come at the Expense of Academic Success? (Eastern Educational Research Association)</a></p></li> </ul> <p>This list shows Dual Credit courses that this school offers.</p> <p>Students gain important benefits from dual credit courses, including reducing college costs for low-income families, improving high school graduation rate, and helping students graduate from college earlier. Advanced students gain access to a wider range of more challenging courses, and dual credit establishes a smoother transition from high school to college. Unlike dual enrollment, dual credit courses always provide High School credit.</p> <ul> <li><p><a href="http://www.iccb.org/dualcredit.html" target="_blank">Dual Credit (Illinois Community College Board)</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://www.iccb.org/pdf/reports/dualcreditrpt_January2010.pdf" target="_blank">Dual Credit in the Illinois Community College System (Illinois Community College Board)</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://www.ibhe.org/DualCredit/materials/ICCBAdministrativeRules.pdf" target="_blank">Dual Enrollment and College Credit Programs (Community College Research Center)</a></p></li> </ul> <p>This list shows fine and applied arts courses that this school offers.</p> <p>Research has revealed significant benefits to access to the arts, particularly for low-income students. For instance, low-income students engaged in the arts are more likely to take advanced courses in high school, participate in extracurricular activities, earn a college degree, and pursue a professional career.</p> <ul> <li><p><a href="http://www.oecd-ilibrary.org/education/art-for-art-s-sake_9789264180789-en" target="_blank">Art for Art’s Sake? The Impact of Arts Education (Centre for Educational Research and Innovation)</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://www.nasaa-arts.org/Research/Key-Topics/Arts-Education/critical-evidence.pdf" target="_blank">How the Arts Benefit Student Achievement (National Assembly of State Arts Agencies)</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://www.artsusa.org/get_involved/advocacy/funding_resources/default_005.asp" target="_blank">Benefits of Arts Education (Americans for the Arts) </a></p></li> </ul> <p>This list shows physical education courses that this school offers.</p> <p>Schools offering courses to promote good health are preparing their students to live healthy lifestyles.</p> <ul> <li><p><a href="http://www.education.com/reference/article/Ref_Physical_Education/" target="_blank">Physical Education is Crucial to a Complete Education (National Association for Sport and Physical Education) </a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://www2.illinois.gov/ltgov/Documents/Education/Enhanced%20PE%20Fact%20Sheet.pdf" target="_blank">Enhancing Physical Education in Illinois: How Investing in P.E. Yields Higher Achievers (Illinois Fact Sheet)</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://www.depts.ttu.edu/hess/_documents/research/lochbaum/Stevens%20To%20Stevenson%20Lochbaum.pdf" target="_blank">The Importance of Physical Activity and Physical Education in the Prediction of Academic Achievement (Texas Tech University)</a></p></li> </ul> <p>This list shows health and nutrition courses that this school offers.</p> <p>Schools offering courses to promote good health are preparing their students to live healthy lifestyles.</p> <ul> <li><p><a href="http://www.dodea.edu/wellness/upload/stn_health_grd_PK_12.pdf" target="_blank">Health Education Content Standards (US Department of Defense) </a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://www.cdc.gov/healthyyouth/sher/standards/" target="_blank">National Health Education Standards (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention) </a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://www.isbe.state.il.us/ils/pdh/standards.htm" target="_blank">Illinois Learning Standards: Physical Development & Health (Illinois State Board of Education)</a></p></li> </ul> <p>This list shows academic enrichment programs that this school offers.</p> <p>Academic enrichment activities allow for student-directed learning through extracurricular activities. These activities often provide leadership opportunities for students, which colleges and employers both look on favorably.</p> <ul> <li><p><a href="http://www.ascd.org/publications/educational-leadership/sept08/vol66/num01/The-Extracurricular-Advantage.aspx" target="_blank">The Learning Leader: The Extracurricular Advantage (ASCD)</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://rcgd.isr.umich.edu/garp/articles/fredricks05.pdf" target="_blank">Developmental Benefits of Extracurricular Involvement: Do Peer Characteristics Mediate the Link Between Activities and Youth Outcomes? (Journal of Youth and Adolescence)</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://dc.cod.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1370&amp;context=essai" target="_blank">The Positive Effects of Extracurricular Activities on Students (ESSAI)</a></p></li> </ul> <p>This list shows awards won by the school's faculty and staff.</p> <p>Schools are often recognized for the accomplishments of their students and faculty by external organizations, partners, companies, and foundations. Examples include: Teacher of the Year, Librarian of the Year, awards related to school improvement, and grants from foundations, companies, or organizations.</p> N/A <p>This list shows awards won by the school for scholastic performance.</p> <p>Schools, groups, and individual students are often recognized for scholastic accomplishments by external organizations, partners, companies, and foundations. Scholastic awards may include academic competitions such as Science Fair, Worldwide Youth in Science, Academic Decathlon, and Geographic Bee.</p> N/A <p>This list shows awards won by the school's athletics programs.</p> <p>Student athletes often gain recognition for success in interscholastic and intramural competitions. Awards may be at the regional, state, or national level.</p> N/A <p>This list shows awards won by the school, awarded by local, state, or national organizations outside the school.</p> <p>Schools are often recognized for the accomplishments of their students and faculty by community, organizations, partners, companies, and foundations.</p> <p>N/A</p> <p>No Explanation Available</p> <p>No Context Available</p> <p>N/A</p> <p>No Explanation Available</p> <p>No Context Available</p> <p>N/A</p> <p>This graph shows the percentage of students who miss 5 percent or more of school days per year without a valid excuse. By selecting, “Show 5-Year Trend,” you can see changes in the student population over time. By selecting, "Add District Comparison" or "Add State Comparison," you can compare the percentage of Chronically Truant Students at this particular school to the district and state averages.</p> <p>Illinois law defines “chronic truant” as a student who misses 5 percent of school days within an academic year without a valid excuse. That’s nine days of an average 180-day school year. The count of chronically truant students does not include students with excused absences, such as doctors’ appointments or students over the age of 16, who are not legally required to attend school. Chronic truants are at risk of academic and behavioral problems. Research shows that chronic truancy has been linked to serious delinquent activity in youth and to significant negative behavior and characteristics in adults.</p> <p>For ALL supporting research issues see other document reviewing supporting research – titled Metrics and Research with annotations 10-7.</p> <ul> <li><p><a href="http://www.whatworks.uwex.edu/attachment/whatworks_05.pdf‎" target="_blank">Finding effective solutions to truancy (University of Wisconsin – Madison)</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="https://www.ncjrs.gov/pdffiles1/ojjdp/188947.pdf" target="_blank">Truancy Reduction: Keeping Kids in School (Department of Justice)</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://www.psesd.org/conferences/alt2suspension/docs/Truancy%20Resource.pdf" target="_blank">Truancy Reduction: Research, Policy and Practice (Center for Children and Youth Justice)</a></p></li> </ul> <p>No Explanation Available</p> <p>No Context Available</p> <p>N/A</p> <p>No Explanation Available</p> <p>No Context Available</p> <p>N/A</p> <p>No Explanation Available</p> <p>No Context Available</p> <p>N/A</p> <p>No Explanation Available</p> <p>No Context Available</p> <p>N/A</p> <p>No Explanation Available</p> <p>No Context Available</p> <p>N/A</p> <p>No Explanation Available</p> <p>No Context Available</p> <p>N/A</p> <p>No Explanation Available</p> <p>No Context Available</p> <p>N/A</p> <p>No Explanation Available</p> <p>No Context Available</p> <p> N/A</p> <p>No Explanation Available</p> <p>No Context Available</p> <p>N/A</p> <p>No Explanation Available</p> <p>No Context Available</p> <p>N/A</p> <p>No Explanation Available</p> <p>No Context Available</p> <p>N/A</p> <p>No Explanation Available</p> <p>No Context Available</p> <p>N/A</p> <p>No Explanation Available</p> <p>No Context Available</p> <p>N/A</p> <p>Some schools offer courses to help students with transitions, study skills, remediation, or bilingual education.</p> <p>Schools that provide a wide variety of programs better serve the needs of their students and strive to equal achievement for all learners.</p> <ul> <li><p><a href="http://www.nabe.org/BilingualEducation" target="_blank">What is Bilingual Education? (National Association of Bilingual Education)</a></p></li> </ul> <p>This list shows additional options the school may offer for career development.</p> <p>Career programs allow students to participate in experiences that let them better understand the demands of the workplace.</p> <ul> <li><p><a href="http://www.cew.wisc.edu/docs/resource_collections/Kazis_RemakingCTE.pdf" target="_blank">Remaking Career and Technical Education for the 21st Century: What Role for High School Programs? (Jobs for the Future and Aspen Institute)</a></p></li> </ul> <p>This list includes non-credit or extracurricular fine and applied arts programs</p> <p>Fine and applied arts programs, located at school and in the community, help to develop students’ talents and interests. These activities often provide skill development and leadership opportunities for students, which both colleges and employers look on favorably.</p> <ul> <li><p><a href="http://www.oecd-ilibrary.org/education/art-for-art-s-sake_9789264180789-en" target="_blank">Art for Art’s Sake? The Impact of Arts Education (Centre for Educational Research and Innovation)</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://www.nasaa-arts.org/Research/Key-Topics/Arts-Education/critical-evidence.pdf" target="_blank">How the Arts Benefit Student Achievement (National Assembly of State Arts Agencies)</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://www.artsusa.org/get_involved/advocacy/funding_resources/default_005.asp" target="_blank">Benefits of Arts Education (Americans for the Arts)</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://arts.gov/news/2012/new-nea-research-report-shows-potential-benefits-arts-education-risk-youth" target="_blank">New NEA Research Report Shows Potential Benefits of Arts Education for At-Risk Youth</a></p></li> </ul> <p>Teacher Proficiency will show the percentage of teachers rated proficient or excellent in teacher evaluations. (Coming by 2015)</p> <p>No Context Available</p> <p>N/A</p> <p>This display indicates whether or not the school has made Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP).</p> <p>AYP represents the annual academic performance targets in reading and math that the State, school districts, and schools must reach to be considered on track for 100% proficiency by school year 2013-14.</p> <p>AYP is based on three factors: the percentage of students who meet or exceed the standards in math and reading; the percentage of students participating in the ISAT, PSAE, or IAA assessments; and the attendance rate at the elementary/middle schools or the graduation rate at the high school level.</p> <ul> <li><p><a href="http://webprod.isbe.net/ereportcard/publicsite/getSearchCriteria.aspx" target="_blank">Compliance Report Card</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://www.isbe.state.il.us/ayp/htmls/ayp_factors.htm" target="_blank">Resources – Factors Considered in Determining AYP</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://www2.ed.gov/nclb/accountability/ayp/edpicks.jhtml" target="_blank">Adequate Yearly Progress</a></p></li> </ul> <p>This display indicates whether or not the school has made Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP).</p> <p>AYP represents the annual academic performance targets in reading and math that the State, school districts, and schools must reach to be considered on track for 100% proficiency by school year 2013-14.</p> <p>AYP is based on three factors: the percentage of students who meet or exceed the standards in math and reading; the percentage of students participating in the ISAT, PSAE, or IAA assessments; and the attendance rate at the elementary/middle schools or the graduation rate at the high school level.</p> <ul> <li><p><a href="http://webprod.isbe.net/ereportcard/publicsite/getSearchCriteria.aspx" target="_blank">Compliance Report Card</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://www.isbe.state.il.us/ayp/htmls/ayp_factors.htm" target="_blank">Resources – Factors Considered in Determining AYP</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://www2.ed.gov/nclb/accountability/ayp/edpicks.jhtml" target="_blank">Adequate Yearly Progress</a></p></li> </ul> <p>This display indicates whether or not the school has made Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP).</p> <p>AYP represents the annual academic performance targets in reading and math that the State, school districts, and schools must reach to be considered on track for 100% proficiency by school year 2013-14.</p> <p>AYP is based on three factors: the percentage of students who meet or exceed the standards in math and reading; the percentage of students participating in the ISAT, PSAE, or IAA assessments; and the attendance rate at the elementary/middle schools or the graduation rate at the high school level.</p> <ul> <li><p><a href="http://webprod.isbe.net/ereportcard/publicsite/getSearchCriteria.aspx" target="_blank">Compliance Report Card</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://www.isbe.state.il.us/ayp/htmls/ayp_factors.htm" target="_blank">Resources – Factors Considered in Determining AYP</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://www2.ed.gov/nclb/accountability/ayp/edpicks.jhtml" target="_blank">Adequate Yearly Progress</a></p></li> </ul> <p>This display indicates whether or not the district has made Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP).</p> <p>AYP represents the annual academic performance targets in reading and math that the State, school districts, and schools must reach to be considered on track for 100% proficiency by school year 2013-14.</p> <p>AYP is based on three factors: the percentage of students who meet or exceed the standards in math and reading; the percentage of students participating in the ISAT, PSAE, or IAA assessments; and the attendance rate at the elementary/middle schools or the graduation rate at the high school level.</p> <ul> <li><p><a href="http://webprod.isbe.net/ereportcard/publicsite/getSearchCriteria.aspx" target="_blank">Compliance Report Card</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://www.isbe.state.il.us/ayp/htmls/ayp_factors.htm" target="_blank">Resources – Factors Considered in Determining AYP</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://www2.ed.gov/nclb/accountability/ayp/edpicks.jhtml" target="_blank">Adequate Yearly Progress</a></p></li> </ul> <p>AYP represents the annual academic performance targets in reading and math that the State, school districts, and schools must reach to be considered on track for 100% proficiency by school year 2013-14. This link is to the statewide Report Card summarizing results for all schools and districts in Illinois. To view individual school report cards, refer to the district or school page.</p> <p>AYP is based on three factors: the percentage of students who meet or exceed the standards in math and reading; the percentage of students participating in the ISAT, PSAE, or IAA assessments; and the attendance rate at the elementary/middle schools or the graduation rate at the high school level.</p> <ul> <li><p><a href="http://webprod.isbe.net/ereportcard/publicsite/getSearchCriteria.aspx" target="_blank">Compliance Report Card</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://www.isbe.state.il.us/ayp/htmls/ayp_factors.htm" target="_blank">Resources – Factors Considered in Determining AYP</a></p></li> <li><p><a href="http://www2.ed.gov/nclb/accountability/ayp/edpicks.jhtml" target="_blank">Adequate Yearly Progress</a></p></li> </ul>